China

Restaurants in China

China's cuisine is amazingly complex and multi-faceted and travelers will find restaurants in China that specialize in all the various regional styles of cooking. The best restaurants in China range from some that offer white-glove service and banquets with countless courses to humble stalls that may sell only one particular broth or noodle dish. Peking duck is, of course, one of China's most famous dishes and the Dadong Roast Duck Restaurant in Beijing is one of the best places to taste the duck exactly as it should be prepared and served, in three courses. 

The Donglaishun restaurants began as a food stall in 1903, but now they are famous for their Mongolian hotpots where diners cook their own meat (traditionally, thinly sliced mutton) and vegetables in a tableside pot of broth. The China restaurants scenes isn't limited to just Chinese fare. Miichelle Garnault's M restaurants (M on the Bund in Shanghai, M on the Fringe in Hong Kong, and M Capital in Beijing) are some of the most acclaimed of the many using locally sourced ingredients in European—and Middle Eastern and North African—dishes.

This chain of uncomplicated Singapore-originated restaurants manages to do just about everything right. Feast on standards such as lobster with ginger and scallion, a near-perfect Peking duck and barbecued pork.

Fiery Sichuan food on a packed French Concession street.

This Sichuan restaurant is well hidden on the sixth floor of a central district business building. It’s no secret though, since it received a Michelin Bib Gourmand in 2011. This small space has only a handful tables and minimal decor, making it clear that it's all about food, not ambience.

It doesn’t take much sleuthing to discover the specialty of this Causeway Bay restaurant; the name should be a giveaway to crustacean-seeking diners.

This Julu Road eatery is a favorite with expats and locals looking for a unique dining option. Nepali Kitchen serves food of the Himalayas inside its dining room, which has low tables, cushion seats, prayer flags, and bright-colored walls.

One of multiple Jade Garden locations in Shanghai, this restaurant near the Luwan district serves Shanghainese dishes and specialties, such as drunken chicken and kao fu. Tender meats like eel and tea-smoked duck collaborate with rich sauces to deliver a diverse, multi-course meal.

Sometimes the best way to find a restaurant is look for the longest lines, and that’s the case for this street-side restaurant that specializes in shengjian baozi, steamed pork buns. A couple dollars will buy four of these thin-skinned snacks, which are partly fried and partly steamed.

Located on the second floor of Cosmo Hotel Mongkok, this cinema-inspired eatery is named after the Italian film studio that produced the work of renowned director Federico Fellini.

As the name implies, it’s all about the roast Peking duck at this Chongwen district restaurant. The Quan Ju De brand (government-affiliated) began in 1864, and now has many locations across China.

A team of Japanese chefs prepare robatayaki, or grilled meats and seafood, in this atmospheric, lantern-lit restaurant, located ina 19th-century lighthouse. Standouts include Yamaguchi chicken, Kagoshima pork, and Australian Wagyu sirloin skewers.

As many as 2,000 people a day pack the eight dining halls of Songhelou Restaurant.

The South Beauty group manages over 40 restaurants across China, and the 881 outpost makes its home in two buildings: a 1930’s restored stone villa and a glass and wood building.