China

Restaurants in China

Finally, Hong Kong has a premier waterfront restaurant with a view of Victoria Harbour, complete with a 270-degree panorama of Kowloon Peninsula. Ask to eat in the private upstairs dining room; it doubles as a wine cellar.

Qi

When counting in Chinese, “qi” means “seven,” and this intimate restaurant offers fare from seven provinces, including Sichuan. The small space on the second floor of the Ritz-Carlton Financial Street in the Chaoyang district has seven private rooms of varying sizes.

The glowing harbor from this restaurant's 28th floor window resembles a nautical Times Square with boats beating their way across the water, framed by a skyline garishly lit with the names of troubled American banks. The men’s room is already infamous.

Despite the exclusive-sounding moniker, this French Concession restaurant is open to common and famous; Ralph Fiennes, Yao Ming, and Jackie Chan have all graced the guest list. The villa has played many parts in its history, as home, office, and dining spot.

There’s no need to settle for one culinary style at this vast international buffet, located on the seventh floor of the Island Shangri-La hotel.

This venue is closed.

Witness the 1940’s ambience, retro chandeliers, and gray-haired servers at the new but oh-so-old-world restaurant. Flower crab steeped in aged Chinese wine and funky minced pork–and–salted fish patties are just some of the standouts on the seasonal Cantonese menu.

Qu Nar Restaurant (the name means "Where are you going?" in Mandarin) is well hidden down an alley off a main Beijing road: It looks like a bunker on the outside, but the unremarkable interior includes projected art by the owner, Ai Weiwei (the artist who designed the Bird’s Nest stadium for the

Part restaurant and part nightclub, Dragon-i draws a seemingly endless parade of models and A-list celebrities, with past guests including David Beckham, Jude Law, and Naomi Campbell.

Kowloon may not be the first place you’d expect to find Nordic seafood, but “Food, Ideas, Nightlife, Drinks, and Service” aims to provide sea-dwelling fare from Finland, Iceland, Norway, Denmark and Sweden.

"This Bellagio is not a Las Vegas hotel, but a faux-swanky Taiwanese brasserie. There are several locations in Shanghai, and they're all open at all hours.

The historic Union Building became “Three on the Bund” in 2004, and the fifth floor houses the 120-seat Whampoa Club. Located inside one of the Financial Street district's last siheyuan (courtyards), the restaurant has an Art Deco interior with gold and red tones and a lotus pond.