China

Restaurants in China

Babbo alumnus Vinny Lauria serves hearty Italian standards—beef carpaccio; bucatini all’amatriciana; Neapolitan-style pizza—against a backdrop of toile-patterned walls and solid walnut floors.

Hidden among the back alleys of Beijing and within the Dongcheng neighborhood, the Dali Courtyard offers a quaint outdoor setting and authentic Yunnanese cuisine. Food from the southern province of Yunnan utilizes the herbs of the region, as well as the mushrooms it’s known for.

Newbies are easily spotted when it comes to xiaolong bao buns: Just look for the telltale shirt stains from the soup-filled dumplings, which tend to explode when bitten into.

This Causeway Bay restaurant is one of the most storied in Hong Kong and is still run by the family who started it. While 1860 marked the beginning of this Western-style chain, this location opened in 1971 and is one of three Hong Kong locations.

At the entrance to this popular Italian eatery, a large oven churns out batch after batch of the restaurant's eponymous dish: homemade breadsticks (grissini in Italian).

This sleek Japanese bar and dining room lets patrons walk the runway that separates the restaurant and bar areas. Part of the Aqua restaurant group, this hip Times Square location is decorated in gold, red, and black; the catwalk is gold, and the Lipstick Lounge’s color is bright shades of red.

The restaurant, overlooking the harbor, serves delightful sweet barbecued pork buns, steamed rice-flour cannelloni with diced scallop and crabmeat, and crispy spring rolls with shredded chicken and the glorious zing of pickles.

Nine lights at the end of a cement staircase make up the unmarked entrance to this trendy restaurant and bar. Once the mystery of entrance is solved, a modern gray interior is the setting for contemporary Chinese cuisine.

Kee
Yu

There’s nothing better than fresh fruit on a plane. Stop at this clean kiosk—which sells fruit by weight or prepackaged—for mangoes, dragon fruit, green apples, and more.

The dark, Deco-y Shanghainese restaurant serves roast duck wrapped in mantou buns, kao fu, a warm, brown, bready, tofu-like rice-gluten substance that is very comforting; and steamed fish head.