China

Restaurants in China

The revamped Hyatt Regency Tsim Sha Tsui houses Hugo’s, a stalwart restaurant favored by the city’s power brokers. On the menu: standards such as lobster bisque and steak tartare, prepared tableside.

A 400-year-old institution on the same pedestrian thoroughfare, where the specialty is a rich braised ham with honey glaze.

Xiao long bao (Shanghainese soup dumplings) are the speciality. ($1)

Similar to an American speakeasy, this gourmet Chinese restaurant is part of a local culinary tradition known as a “private kitchen,” a secretive, largely unadvertised restaurant hidden away in a nondescript location.

“Fine cuisine” is not usually the first thing that pops to mind when talking about the government. In this case though, the Sichuan provincial office hosts a restaurant, highlighting the fiery spice of Sichuan fare. Each province is represented by an official restaurant in Beijing.

This restaurant on the sixth floor of the Four Seasons Hong Kong has established itself as a French cuisine authority in Hong Kong, earning three Michelin stars in 2011 and 2012.

The lonely expat from Italy needn’t look far for a taste of the homeland, since this Causeway Bay restaurant brings in fresh ingredients from Rome on a weekly basis. Diners don’t go for the ambience or presentation, as neither are emphasized.

The famous Longjing tea leaves from the Hangzhou region make the stir-fried freshwater shrimp taste sweet and earthy, but the star of the show is missing from the English side of the menu—the smoked yellow croaker, an unremarkable, bottom-dwelling creature that, in the hands of the Tin Heung Lau

At this pint-sized restauarant chef-owner Que Vinh Dang, who has worked for Rocco DiSpirito and Geoffrey Zakarian, injects playful Americana into his set menu with riffs on alphabet soup and sloppy joes.