China

Restaurants in China

China's cuisine is amazingly complex and multi-faceted and travelers will find restaurants in China that specialize in all the various regional styles of cooking. The best restaurants in China range from some that offer white-glove service and banquets with countless courses to humble stalls that may sell only one particular broth or noodle dish. Peking duck is, of course, one of China's most famous dishes and the Dadong Roast Duck Restaurant in Beijing is one of the best places to taste the duck exactly as it should be prepared and served, in three courses. 

The Donglaishun restaurants began as a food stall in 1903, but now they are famous for their Mongolian hotpots where diners cook their own meat (traditionally, thinly sliced mutton) and vegetables in a tableside pot of broth. The China restaurants scenes isn't limited to just Chinese fare. Miichelle Garnault's M restaurants (M on the Bund in Shanghai, M on the Fringe in Hong Kong, and M Capital in Beijing) are some of the most acclaimed of the many using locally sourced ingredients in European—and Middle Eastern and North African—dishes.

Finally, Hong Kong has a premier waterfront restaurant with a view of Victoria Harbour, complete with a 270-degree panorama of Kowloon Peninsula. Ask to eat in the private upstairs dining room; it doubles as a wine cellar.

Qi

When counting in Chinese, “qi” means “seven,” and this intimate restaurant offers fare from seven provinces, including Sichuan. The small space on the second floor of the Ritz-Carlton Financial Street in the Chaoyang district has seven private rooms of varying sizes.

The glowing harbor from this restaurant's 28th floor window resembles a nautical Times Square with boats beating their way across the water, framed by a skyline garishly lit with the names of troubled American banks. The men’s room is already infamous.

Despite the exclusive-sounding moniker, this French Concession restaurant is open to common and famous; Ralph Fiennes, Yao Ming, and Jackie Chan have all graced the guest list. The villa has played many parts in its history, as home, office, and dining spot.

There’s no need to settle for one culinary style at this vast international buffet, located on the seventh floor of the Island Shangri-La hotel.

This venue is closed.

Witness the 1940’s ambience, retro chandeliers, and gray-haired servers at the new but oh-so-old-world restaurant. Flower crab steeped in aged Chinese wine and funky minced pork–and–salted fish patties are just some of the standouts on the seasonal Cantonese menu.

Some say the bay was named after the British navy’s repulsing of squatter pirates, while others claim a ship inspired the moniker. Whatever the origin, this area of Hong Kong's Southern District is now home to pricey apartments, expensive restaurants, and upscale shopping.

The long menu of à la carte Cantonese dishes here includes Chinese-style chicken soup and stir-fried scallops with vegetables in zesty XO sauce. Dim sum fanatics can get their fix with choices like pork and mushroom dumplings and steamed pork buns.

Daniel Boulud’s French-American outpost with a Beijing twist housed in the former U.S. Embassy. The goose egg en cocotte with smoked potato and chorizo is a surefire way to refuel for brunch.

Wheat buns toasted on a griddle and filled with braised pork are served from a take-out window at this popular restaurant. The restaurant is decorated with colorful toys and short-legged tables, making it a good option for families.

Haya Ronen plays dual roles of chef and owner at this spot in the Jing ‘an district that specializes in Israeli-influenced fare. The purple and yellow sign above the door welcomes diners, and an open, vividly-colored space sets a casual tone.