China

Hotels in China

Muted spa-like rooms (blond-wood furniture; white leather sofas) atop a 66-story skyscraper—the tallest on Chang’an Avenue. 

Popular business hotel in Pacific Place with newly redone guest rooms and the largest-capacity ballroom in town.

Room to Book: Premier rooms with a mountain or harbor view.

Located on Kowloon’s Golden Mile, a major shopping thoroughfare, this 15-story hotel is within a five-minute walk of the Jordan railway station, as well as tourist attractions like the Temple Street Night Market.

When it opened, 1,358 foot-tall the Park Hyatt Shanghai stole the title of world's tallest hotel (from its sister property across the street, the Grand Hyatt Shanghai).

Italianate grandeur is the aesthetic of choice at this Kowloon property, set a few blocks away from the Tsim Sha Tsui waterfront (with its Star Ferry dock and hulking Harbour Plaza shopping center).

One of the world’s tallest hotels, this property (which occupies floors 53–87) also has a rooftop bar and an Art Deco–meets–Chinese aesthetic. 

Room to Book: Ask for a river-facing room for views of the Huangpu.

Doubles from $468.

Three-year-old hotel with a soaring lobby atrium, 20 minutes by car from the airport—closer than most.

Since it opened in March 2005, the glass-and-steel Langham Place, designed by the same team behind Tokyo's Roppongi Hills complex, has quietly become the city's hidden gem.

Stunning views and sleek design; a favorite of business travelers to Hong Kong, as it’s connected to the convention center. 

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Though the name sounds like something from a sci-fi movie, the Cyberport is a group of buildings in the Western District created to serve as a center for ICT (information and communications technology.) A key part of the high-tech collaboration center is this contemporary, 173-room high-rise hote

A quiet B&B in a lane house in the French Concession.

Multiple buildings surround a quadrangle in this courtyard-style Dongcheng neighborhood hotel, which is down an ancient alley, or hutong. Buildings dating from dynasties pastincluding Qing, Yuan, and Mingare scattered around it.

Shanghai hotels tend toward the vertical and voluptuous, but one look at this austere lobby—exposed brick walls; steel beams; stone floors—and it’s clear the Waterhouse has broken the mold.

One of the Ritz-Carlton’s new-look hotels, this funky, modern Financial Street outpost bears no traces of the chain’s signature country-estate grandeur.

In December 2009, Banyan Tree opened 72 waterfront suites and villas in the 2,800-acre Xixi National Wetland Park.