China

Hotels in China

For decades, hotels in China outside of Hong Kong could be rough going. Today, however, Beijing and Shanghai are home to some of the best hotels in China and secondary cities are seeing a boom in hotel growth as well. The Peninsula, which had been a reliable Beijing mainstay, raised the bar along with many other China hotels a decade ago. Its 2004 renovation brought some pizzazz to the 525 rooms, now outfitted with all the latest tech amenities. The Pudong Shangri-La exemplifies the energy of Shanghai today, with 952 rooms in the soaring modernist twin towers. It got the official seal of approval as one of Yin Mao's favorite hotels in China when he tied the knot here in 2007.  

Beyond the country's popular urban centers of Beijing and Shanghai, it's hard to keep up with the five-star hotels and resorts with hundreds of rooms as well as smaller more quirky properties that are opening. The 47-room Amanyfayun, near Hangzhou, is designed like a Chinese village surrounded by fields of tea.

Formerly the Regent Shanghai, the Longemont hotel rises 53 stories above the Changning district, just 10 minutes from the Bund. Inside, huge white columns and a spiral staircase create a sense of drama in the high-ceilinged lobby.

All 1,171 guest rooms at this hotel, linked to the airport via pedestrian bridge, are comfortably appointed with down duvets, stylish décor, and dramatic runway views—but you don’t have to be a guest to take advantage of its indoor and outdoor pools, spa, or steam room and sauna.

209-room Imperial-style hotel adjacent to the Forbidden City and Tiananmen Square.

Inspired by China’s imperial palaces (lacquered red pillars; gold bamboo panels; crystal chandeliers), with escalator access to one of the city’s most upscale shopping malls. 

Since 1928, this Hong Kong institution has defined the luxury hotel experience, and although certain kinds of travelers (especially lovers of sleek, high-tech minimalism) may find the Peninsula too old-world, there’s no denying it’s a serious class act.

There's no better place to embrace Shanghai's glamorous past and high-tech future than from these twin towers on the northern section of the Bund.

Beijing’s toniest hotel became even tonier in 2008, thanks to a $27 million refurbishment.

The first boutique hotel in Beijing's edgy 798 Art District, an enclave of galleries in former factory buildings. Work by notable locals such as photographer Chi Peng is on view in the 30 gray-walled guest rooms.

When it opened, 1,358 foot-tall the Park Hyatt Shanghai stole the title of world's tallest hotel (from its sister property across the street, the Grand Hyatt Shanghai).

Italianate grandeur is the aesthetic of choice at this Kowloon property, set a few blocks away from the Tsim Sha Tsui waterfront (with its Star Ferry dock and hulking Harbour Plaza shopping center).

One of the world’s tallest hotels, this property (which occupies floors 53–87) also has a rooftop bar and an Art Deco–meets–Chinese aesthetic. 

Room to Book: Ask for a river-facing room for views of the Huangpu.

Doubles from $468.

Three-year-old hotel with a soaring lobby atrium, 20 minutes by car from the airport—closer than most.

24-story building on well-manicured grounds. The Chi spa offers treatments from Thailand, Tibet, and China.

Home to some of the largest hotel rooms in Hong Kong, this stylish sanctuary, just two minutes’ walk from Lan Kwai Fong (the city’s bustling nightlife nucleus), epitomizes contemporary design.