Hotels in China

Located just off Huaihai Road, this historic hotel is perhaps best known as the site where former President Nixon and Zhou Enlai signed the Shanghai Communiqué in 1972.

Set on 21 floors of the Pacific Place Towers skyscraper, with larger-than-average guest rooms; downstairs is the posh Pacific Place Mall.

Lijiang, a UNESCO World Heritage Site known as the Venice of Asia for its centuries-old network of canals and bridges, sits in a forested nook of mountainous Yunnan province. The Banyan Tree resort is as picturesque as its location.

209-room Imperial-style hotel adjacent to the Forbidden City and Tiananmen Square.

Housed in a pair of blue-glass towers, the Shanghai JC Mandarin hotel is located in the Nanjing Road shopping district, just across the street from Plaza 66. Inside the lobby, a five-story mural of Admiral Zheng Ho—a 14th-century seafarer—is surrounded by gold-foiled images of the sun and sea.

Although it’s only a few hours from the city, this villa hotel near the Great Wall feels a world away. This peaceful eco-ranch in the Huairou Mountains offers ten villas for rent, each decorated with the tastes of Manchuria, China, and Tibet.

The exterior of this Dongcheng neighborhood boutique has a lattice pattern. When lit up at night, it resembles a giant lantern, one of the traditional Chinese elements that are strongly represented in the design of this 89-room hotel.

The infinity pool on the terrace of the new $12,468-a-night Presidential Suite at the InterContinental appears to share water with Victoria Harbour.

Fresh from a $65 million makeover,this 492-room property has a sleek 18,000-square-foot spa and a restaurant by star Singaporean chef Justin Quek. Each of the tech-savvy guest rooms contains a practical mobile phone for use in Hong Kong.

Muted spa-like rooms (blond-wood furniture; white leather sofas) atop a 66-story skyscraper—the tallest on Chang’an Avenue. 

Just a block south of Nanjing Road in the heart of downtown, this 37-floor luxury tower sits snuggled among similarly soaring office buildings.