Chile

Chile Travel Guide

Latin America's most famous dance has long thrived in Valparaíso; the uninitiated may be satisfied with performances at Bar Cinzano and La Piedra Feliz, but this new club has superior live performances with singers and bandonion (an instrument similar to the accordion).

Explore the valley on foot, horseback, or bicycle, or visit the family cheese operation (the Matetics make a killer sheep's-milk cheese), and cap the afternoon off with a tour of the winery, a stunning hillside facility with a theatrical oval barrel cellar and a pair of grand tasting rooms with a

Latin America's first fashion museum. The state-of-the-art facility, bankrolled by textile scion Jorge Yarur Bascuñán, features an 8,000-piece collection spanning four centuries.

A collective of cutting-edge jewelers can be found across the foyer at Ají.

The two-hour tour of the 136-year-old, 345-acre Viña Errázuriz begins among the garden's fountains and fragrant sweet peas, and climbs through the vineyards for an expansive view of the property.

The massive preserve covers 8,000 acres of forest and has six pristine miles of oceanfront. Guides lead guests to see the old-growth forests, giant 4,000-year-old Andean alerce trees, and wildlife like the Humboldt and Magellanic penguins.

After 111 years, porteños of all ages still seek refuge here come nightfall. It's familiar, friendly, and lively, with a long, low bar, a few primitive refrigerators, and creaky crooked floorboards.

See relics of Chile's maritime heritage: there's a room dedicated to Bernardo O'Higgins, the principal leader in Chile's fight for independence, and founder of the navy; and sections of the Esmeralda, the infamous wooden galleon that stood up to Peru's iron battleships in the War of the Pacific (

Showcasing the work of more than 300 local artists, the Museo de Artes Visuales, or MAVI, serves as a center for Chilean contemporary art.

Here, French owner Alexandra Marnier Lapostolle (heiress to the Grand Marnier fortune) produces Clos Apalta, the premium line of Casa Lapostolle, in a spectacular state- of-the-art winery, carved six stories deep into solid granite.

Vendors hawk remnants of the city's glory days amid the crooning of tango singers every Sunday. Score flea-market finds (rare Condorito comics depicting Chile's beloved flip-flop–wearing condor) and antiques (like a 1918 stand-up Victrola).