Chile Travel Guide

Here, French owner Alexandra Marnier Lapostolle (heiress to the Grand Marnier fortune) produces Clos Apalta, the premium line of Casa Lapostolle, in a spectacular state- of-the-art winery, carved six stories deep into solid granite.

Vendors hawk remnants of the city's glory days amid the crooning of tango singers every Sunday. Score flea-market finds (rare Condorito comics depicting Chile's beloved flip-flop–wearing condor) and antiques (like a 1918 stand-up Victrola).

Latin America's most famous dance has long thrived in Valparaíso; the uninitiated may be satisfied with performances at Bar Cinzano and La Piedra Feliz, but this new club has superior live performances with singers and bandonion (an instrument similar to the accordion).

The winery give lessons on biodynamic winemaking.

Latin America's first fashion museum. The state-of-the-art facility, bankrolled by textile scion Jorge Yarur Bascuñán, features an 8,000-piece collection spanning four centuries.

The store carries avant-garde clothing sold in the parlor of a 20th-century mansion.

Viña Montes's feng shui–enhanced La Finca de Apalta Estate is home to the voluptuous Montes Alpha M, a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, and Petit Verdot.

In muralist Patricio Peña Oltra's gallery, sift through the works of 36 emerging local artists, stacked in boxes and leaning against the walls.

See relics of Chile's maritime heritage: there's a room dedicated to Bernardo O'Higgins, the principal leader in Chile's fight for independence, and founder of the navy; and sections of the Esmeralda, the infamous wooden galleon that stood up to Peru's iron battleships in the War of the Pacific (

The 96-year-old Neoclassical palace houses 2,700 canvases by Chilean and global painters.