Chicago

Restaurants in Chicago

Chicago restaurants reflect the city’s diversity and richness: deep-dish pizza, hot dogs piled high with fixins’, restaurants helmed by celebrity chefs, and entire neighborhoods dedicated to certain culinary delights, like Greektown and Chinatown. For an unmatched view of the Chicago waterfront, try Riva on the Navy Pier. Their menu includes classic seafood dishes like oysters, lobster corn bisque and crab cakes, as well as a selection of steaks and a number of modern twists on traditional dishes. The food is matched only by the incredible view of Chicago’s skyline.

The Michelin-starred Allium Chicago, a foodie favorite, is a classically American dining experience for a classically American city – with a farm-to-table twist. The establishment serves up menus inspired by Chicago’s local markets – seasonal vegetables and cheeses, an assortment of local meats, and Chicago classics like the Chicago Style Hot Dog with “homemade everything.” Chicago restaurants are also indebted to the lunch counter scene of the 1960s; for a taste of that old vibe, visit Paul Kahan’s Blackbird Dining Room. This Chicago restaurant merges minimalism with farm-fresh dining for an unforgettable experience.

Set along the Chicago Riverwalk, O’Brien’s outdoor dining area is a terrific place to soak in a sunny day and enjoy views of Old Town. Open between May and October, the cafe offers indoor seating, but the tables outside are often in higher demand.

A stone's throw from Millennium Park, the Gage is a gastropub specializing in faithful but wholly unique reinterpretations of comfort food and classic pub grub.

Located inside the James Hotel, owner and renowned chef David Burke’s Primehouse is known for its awarding-winning cuts of meat, such as the 55-day aged rib eye. Red leather tables and brown leather chairs fill the dining room, where patrons head for dishes from the ever-rotating menu.

Inside an unassuming storefront on Chicago Avenue sits one of the city’s favorite bakeries, Hoosier Mama Pie Company.

Immortalized by the 1970’s Saturday Night Live skit in which a short-order cook (John Belushi) screamed “Cheezborger! Cheezborger! No fries, cheeps!

On a wood plank sign, colorful markers advertising authentic Costa Rican dishes welcome visitors to this family-owned café in Bucktown.

Upon entering this modern Japanese restaurant, patrons are wowed by a Jeffrey Beers-designed interior adorned with a water wall, oversize mirrors, red leather chairs, and an undulating wooden ceiling hung with copper chandeliers.

Chicago hot-dog lovers tend to lie in one of two camps—the newfangled spot Hot Doug's or this Windy City classic. Superdawg is an old-school, 1950s-style diner that was ahead of the curve when it opened in 1948.

Although it may look like a typical old-fashioned diner, Ann Sather is actually a Chicago institution. Named after its founder, who established this original Andersonville location in 1945, the Swedish restaurant has now expanded to include two smaller cafés.

An unusual combination of classic comfort foods and innovative cocktails awaits diners at this retro-style restaurant in Bucktown. Illuminated by fringed lamps, the dining room contains red leather booths, a 1920’s-era bar, a working jukebox, and even a selection of board games.

Located in Bucktown, Takashi is a favorite with locals for its unique American-French cuisine with a Japanese flair. Inside, exposed brick is painted slate gray, and white upholstered chairs sit atop the hardwood floors.

The lowered ceilings, recessed lighting, and plain wooden tables in Rise's dining room channel attention to the sleek bar area, where the sake display is illuminated by pendant light fixtures encircled by whimsical wire loops.