Chicago

Restaurants in Chicago

Marked by a burgundy awning and neon beer signs on the outside, this Irving Park eatery specializes in Mexican fare from the southern state of Oaxaca. Inside, hanging plants and plastic tablecloths emphasis the casualness of Taqueria La Oaxaqueña.

Established in Lincoln Park in 1977, Potbelly began as an antique store that just happened to serve sandwiches to hungry customers. Soon, the shop evolved into a café and has now expanded to become a 200-store franchise.

Situated inside Chicago’s Peninsula hotel, Avenues is a feast for the senses, combining flavorful contemporary cuisine with a lush, elegant atmosphere.

Unless you knew to look for it, you’d probably never notice the dingy storefront of this local secret—and that would be a shame.

Designed to share, the small plates at Quartino are reasonably priced (around $10 each), making it a popular spot for group dinners. Although the interior feels more like a neighborhood deli with hanging meats and glass display cases, the outdoor patio is a comfortable spot to dine.

Located in an old train car, this Lakeview landmark serves greasy spoon specialties on paper plates 24 hours a day.

Homegrown seasonal veggies take the limelight at this trendy “flexitarian” (mostly vegetarian) eatery owned by James Beard Award-winning chef Shawn McClain.

Since 1994, A Taste of Heaven has been delighting the residents of Andersonville with award-winning scones, specialty cupcakes, made-from-scratch pastries, and both sweet and savory entrées.

The hipster BYO nook with four communal tables sits in an Avondale strip mall between a laundromat and a dry cleaner owned by relatives of Korean- American chef Bill Kim. Asian street food?

This venue has closed.

"The Sausage Superstore and Encased Meat Emporium" is how Doug's describes itself, so you know it takes the item between the bun most seriously.

Since 1965, the Brauhaus has been bringing a year-round Oktoberfest spirit to the Lincoln Square neighborhood, where many German immigrants first settled in Chicago.

Translating to “from scratch,” De Cero lives up to its name by offering dishes crafted entirely with homemade ingredients, from fresh crema (cream) to hand-pressed tortillas. The result?