Chicago

Restaurants in Chicago

Founded by Polish immigrant Frank Bobak, this Chicago-based company has been manufacturing artisan sausages and deli meats since 1967.

At the forefront of the groundbreaking molecular gastronomy movement, Alinea offers meals that are quite simply unlike any others.

Master of Mexican gourmet Rick Bayless delights diners with this casual and affordable “little sister” to the more upscale Frontera in River North and North Side’s Topolobampo.

Located within the Hotel Les Armures in the city’s historic Old Town, this restaurant serves traditional Swiss fare in a two-story space that dates from the 17th century.

One of the first sushi bars in Chicago, Kamehachi was opened by Mrs. Marion Konishi in 1967 and has since expanded to include three additional restaurants.

Authentic Persian and Mediterranean cuisine awaits diners at Reza’s, a small local chain of four restaurants. At this Andersonville location, the dining room is set in a former microbrewery with high ceilings, exposed brick, and widely spaced tables that are ideal for date night.

At this tiny Andersonville eatery, a limited menu and extensive wait times are a small price to pay for what's often named the best pizza in Chicago.

Lively tapas and martini joint

This little rectangular, white building with big yellow signs near the Sheridan El stop on Irving Park Road is popular with baseball fans headed to nearby Wrigley Field.

The Scene: Supper club veteran and chef Efrain Cuevas (he did time with Ghetto Gourmet in Oakland) launched a new culinary club earlier this year; bimonthly Chicago-style locavore dinners are held in lofts and gardens within easy striking distance from the Loop.

Americanizing Neapolitan-style pizza, Coalfire, as the name suggests, cooks their pies in an 800-degree oven heated by coal instead of the traditional wood. Even though the city is known for deep dish, this Noble Square is quite popular with locals who love the thin crust.