Chicago

Restaurants in Chicago

Chicago restaurants reflect the city’s diversity and richness: deep-dish pizza, hot dogs piled high with fixins’, restaurants helmed by celebrity chefs, and entire neighborhoods dedicated to certain culinary delights, like Greektown and Chinatown. For an unmatched view of the Chicago waterfront, try Riva on the Navy Pier. Their menu includes classic seafood dishes like oysters, lobster corn bisque and crab cakes, as well as a selection of steaks and a number of modern twists on traditional dishes. The food is matched only by the incredible view of Chicago’s skyline.

The Michelin-starred Allium Chicago, a foodie favorite, is a classically American dining experience for a classically American city – with a farm-to-table twist. The establishment serves up menus inspired by Chicago’s local markets – seasonal vegetables and cheeses, an assortment of local meats, and Chicago classics like the Chicago Style Hot Dog with “homemade everything.” Chicago restaurants are also indebted to the lunch counter scene of the 1960s; for a taste of that old vibe, visit Paul Kahan’s Blackbird Dining Room. This Chicago restaurant merges minimalism with farm-fresh dining for an unforgettable experience.

Since its opening in the former Ambassador East Hotel in 1938, this Gold Coast landmark has hosted such guests as Frank Sinatra, Elizabeth Taylor, Humphrey Bogart, and Ronald Reagan.

Don't be fooled by its shabby appearance. When Danny Meyer was developing the Shake Shack menu, he turned to this 1980s strip-mall relic for frankfurter inspiration. And these char-grilled jobs remain Meyer's favorite bun-pocketed specimens outside New York.

To the delight of Lakeview residents, Doug Zell and his wife Emily Mange established the first Intelligentsia Coffeebar in 1995. Though the small franchise has now grown to five locations, Intelligentsia upholds their original mission to provide the highest quality, direct trade coffee.

The flagship location of an ever-growing national chain, this sandwich shop was first established in 1938 as a curbside wooden food stand in Little Italy.

With a book like Takashi's Noodles under his belt, it makes sense to assume that chef Takashi Yagihashi knows his way around a noodle, whether its the Asian pan variety or Wisconsin-style mac & cheese.

Located on the 40th floor of the Chicago Stock Exchange, Everest is known for its French cuisine, award-winning wine list, and views of the city. Atop each table sits a bronze sculpture by Swiss artist Ivo Soldini, while paintings by Chicago artist Adam Siegel fill the wall space.

An offshoot of the New York original, which was made famous by Sex and the City, Chicago’s Sushi Samba Rio is now part of a small chain (other locations are in Miami, Las Vegas, and London).

Food and science converge at Moto, a “molecular tasting room” set among the warehouses of Fulton Market.

Aside from the absence of cigarette smoke, it’s hard to imagine that this classic steak-and-seafood place has changed much since it first opened in the same wood-framed house in 1941.

A vision of restaurateur Jerry Kleiner, this Near West Side favorite aims to provide a carnival experience. From the restaurant’s high ceiling, a large glass panel filled with brightly colored tiles creates a kaleidoscope of funky hues while salsa music plays throughout the dining room.

Authentic and affordable, this family-owned Puerto Rican café in Humboldt Park is a local favorite despite its no-frills, cafeteria-style interior.

Deep-dish pies are a Chicago phenomenon, and Burt Katz is quite possibly the master of this bready variation. For the past 20 years, kitschy Burt’s Place has been a mecca for buttery caramelized crust and market-fresh toppings, although some sticklers may flinch at the funky, cluttered interior.