Restaurants in Charleston

Located on North Market Street, Mercato serves upscale interpretations of classic Italian fare. While the menu contains the requisite fettuccine alfredo and spaghetti carbonara, it also has more innovative offerings, such as the local shrimp and blue crab risotto with sweet corn.

Housed inside the Charleston Place Hotel in downtown the Charleston Grill offers diners a unique blend of southern, French, and contemporary cuisines, courtesy of executive chef Michelle Weaver. The restaurant’s menu is divided into four categories: Pure, Lush, Southern, and Cosmopolitan.

Tradd Newton renovated an abandoned, 1940’s naval building to open Fleet Landing.

Chef Robert Stehling may not be a Lowcountry local, but his "highrise" biscuits and breakfast shrimp are as authentic as Nana used to make, and the buttermilk pancakes are paired with apple maple syrup and pecan butter.

Housed inside the 150-year-old South Carolina Loan & Trust building, Oak Steakhouse serves steaks, local seafood, and vegetarian dishes with a farm-to-table emphasis.

The Peninsula Grill, which opened in N.

Hemingway vibe. High Cotton, which serves roughly 800 Espresso Martinis a month, takes its name from an old southern term for living well; high-growing cotton was a sign of prosperity.


Bold, modern, global spot with chef Nate Whiting. Order the she-crab soup, loaded with the sweet meat.


Classic Northern Italian

Three generations of the Gadsden family cook at this tiny soul-food cookshop.

Luxe low country. McCrady's is Charleston's first tavern, built in 1778 in the heart of the city's historic French quarter.

Sister restaurant to Charleston mainstays Magnolias and Blossom, Cypress serves a seasonal, Lowcountry- and Pacific Rim-inspired menu by James Beard-nominated chef Craig Deihl.