Cape Cod

Cape Cod Travel Guide


Map sells clothes and gifts, and has guest DJ’s like the writer Michael Cunningham.

One of the secret springs left over from the Ice Age, hidden deep in the Wellfleet and Truro woods. The water is exquisitely clear and silky.

To get there, take the car ferry from Wood's Hole, MA, to Edgartown on Martha’s Vineyard. It’s a short, pretty trip through calm waters. $130 round-trip

The colorful display outside the beachfront shop makes for a popular photo spot in P-town.

The only drive-in theatre still operating on Cape Cod, this nostalgic landmark first opened on Route Six in 1957. Every night from late May until Labor Day weekend, the theatre shows first-run double features on a 100-by-44-foot outdoor screen.

It’s not Napa Valley, but during a tasting you can try some decent wines that are cultivated in the area, plus (for adventurous palates) a special cranberry blend. Some of the wine comes in adorable lighthouse-shaped bottles that can be turned into lamps when you’re done.

Set in a former 1844 schoolhouse, the galery focuses on photography-but also exhibits prints and paintings by area artists, as well as modern furniture, jewelry, and mobiles in the adjacent design store.

In the center of Sandwich, the Weather Store carries barometers, thermometers, and everything else weather-related, both old and new.

This sweet shop serves fudge in every flavor, from plain vanilla to Marshmallow Fluff to Reese’s.

Owners Missy Smith and Sarah Rhinesmith Buckley have a great sense of style. One of the front rooms in their ship captain’s house is devoted to sea-inspired clothes from Tory Burch, Trina Turk, and Calypso.

Craigville Beach, the place to see and be seen in Hyannis, is sometimes called Muscle Beach for its concentration of buff beachgoers.

A symphony of chirping welcomes you to this bird-lovers paradise. The staff has tons of personality—if you tell them a joke, they’ll give you a free pencil.

Art’s Dune Tours, in Provincetown, take travelers off road through the lunar landscape of the dunes outside town; in the distance you can see the shacks that have been inhabited over the years by Tennessee Williams, Jackson Pollock, and other legends, and are still rented to artists.

Located on the end of MacMillan Wharf, this small museum showcases artifacts from the only verified pirate shipwreck ever found: the Whydah, an 18th-century ship commanded by “Black Sam” Bellamy before it sank off the coast of Wellfleet, Massachusetts in 1717.

Located on Main Street in West Chatham, this little gray cedar, cottage-style shop with a blue awning and front porch has a big customer following due to its yummy pies, both sweet and savory.