Canada

Canada Travel Guide

If you’re visiting Toronto, take a helicopter tour of Niagara Falls for a bird’s eye view of the magnificent Horseshoe and American Falls. Or hop aboard the Maid of the Mist boat for a closer look (and a few splashes). Once you’re back on dry land, head to the Royal Ontario Museum to check out its huge art collection, or dance the night away at one of the bars at West Queen West. The French province of Québec has some of the most exciting things to do in Canada.

In Montréal, stroll around the Old Port, the perfect setting for people watching and outdoor dining. Dig into its local cuisine–it’s the city with the largest number of restaurants per capita in North America. If you visit Montréal in late June or early July, make sure you snag tickets to the International Jazz Festival. For those who prefer the great outdoors, there are plenty of things to do in Canada. Alberta has gorgeous lakes, rivers and forests for hiking, and is an ideal location for seeing the Northern Lights aboard a dogsled. Mont Tremblant in Québec and Whistler in British Columbia are two of the best ski regions in Canada.

In the Victorian neighborhood of Gastown, this three-story Native American art gallery showcases ceremonial masks and totem poles, limited-edition prints, and bentwood boxes. The beaded moccasins and hand-carved “talking sticks” make for great souvenirs.

What started as a tiny consignment shop in the indie district around King Edward Avenue has grown into the neighborhood’s premiere boutique for all things antique and secondhand. Find vintage leather clutches and bags alongside baby toys, kitchenware, printed stationery, and more.

Olympic Pedigree: Dutch skater Yvonne van Gennip won three gold medals and broke two world records during the 1988 Winter Games’ speed skating competitions.

 

Inspired by ancient Chinese tea traditions, this shop sells a wide variety of loose-leaf organic teas flavored with all-natural ingredients.

Designed by Marius Dufresne and completed in 1914, the five-story Maisonneuve Market is located in its namesake district. Although historically a daily market, from the 1960s to 1995 there was a police office and cultural center in the Beaux-Arts building.

In May 2009, the city launched North America’s largest public bike-share program, rolling out 3,000 bikes at 400 docksa round the city available 24 hours a day for rent at $5 a day.

In the heart of St.-Roch, this warehouse-like restaurant morphs into a dynamic performance space after dark. Events range from poetry slams, film screenings, and DJ sets to concerts by folk and indie bands from around the country.

Stop by the local Benedictine monastery where monks encourage guests to pick apples in their orchard and sample house-made cheeses and cider.

In the western suburb of Point St. Charles, this 1668 farmstead—with a handsome stone house, outbuildings, and surrounding gardens—has been transformed into a living history museum. It was originally presided over by Marguerite Bourgeoys, founder of the Congregation of Notre Dame.

Original Debut: Home to a fading vaudeville scene when it opened in 1913, the Imperial became a movie house in 1934 when it was leased to Léo-Ernest Ouimet (owner of the Ouimetoscope, the first movie theater in Canada).

Located pre-security on level three in the international departures wing of the Vancouver International Airport, this shop sells a selection of uniquely Canadian food gifts.

The shop specializes in underground comics and illustrated novels, including titles written and produced by the store’s own publishing house.

La Barberie is not a place for a haircut, but a longtime microbrewery at the crossroads of the Saint-Roch district and the entrance to Lower Town.

Created in the style of a traditional European "cabinet of curiousities," the back room of Alexander Lamb's Wunderkammer Antiques displays unique mementoes from its former curators' 45 years of world travel.