Canada Travel Guide

In the Victorian neighborhood of Gastown, this three-story Native American art gallery showcases ceremonial masks and totem poles, limited-edition prints, and bentwood boxes. The beaded moccasins and hand-carved “talking sticks” make for great souvenirs.

What started as a tiny consignment shop in the indie district around King Edward Avenue has grown into the neighborhood’s premiere boutique for all things antique and secondhand. Find vintage leather clutches and bags alongside baby toys, kitchenware, printed stationery, and more.

A pleasant alternative to the ubiquitous newsstands of airportland, this shop has a sizable stack of fiction by Canadian authors (including Carol Shields, Douglas Coupland, Alice Munro, Robertson Davies, and many others) as well as nonfiction and Vancouver- and Canada-themed coffee-table books.

Over the course of its 125-year history, Kensington Market’s composition has closely reflected immigration trends in this multicultural city. Circa-1880s, it housed working-class Irish and Scottish migrant laborers.

The skating rink at Place d'Youville, in windswept Upper Town, is always packed.

Girly dresses, fitted tees, tailored suits, and even, on occasion, handmade shoes, from Canadian designers pepper the racks in this Mount Pleasant boutique set in a former mercantile shop.

Located just two blocks from the park entrance, this West End rental shop gears up sightseers for two wheeled adventures through the trails of Stanley Park and the Vancouver Seawall.

The funky, two-floored shack on the side of the road in Margaree Forks, carries campy stock.

The iconic “five sails” of this waterfront, multi-use complex welcome thousands of arriving cruise-ship passengers on summer days—and also serve as a visual anchor for the city skyline.

From sporting events to summer festivals, this year-round, open-air facility touts the biggest cable-supported retractable roof in the world. Originally opened in 1983, the stadium underwent a massive renovation and reopened in 2011.

Designed by New York architect James O’Donnell, the Gothic Revival-style Notre-Dame Basilica faces Place d'Armes in Old Montreal. Although completed in 1829, the church later added its two towers a decade later—the western tower holds one giant bell and the eastern a 10-bell carillon.

New Favorite: The revamped Rosewood Hotel Georgia, in Vancouver.

Wearable art from B.C. designers and Norway's Oleana.

This ethnic enclave filled with Hasidic, Portuguese, Italian, and Greek communities has been immortalized in the novels of Mordecai Richler, who grew up here and returned often in his books.