Canada Travel Guide

In the Victorian neighborhood of Gastown, this three-story Native American art gallery showcases ceremonial masks and totem poles, limited-edition prints, and bentwood boxes. The beaded moccasins and hand-carved “talking sticks” make for great souvenirs.

What started as a tiny consignment shop in the indie district around King Edward Avenue has grown into the neighborhood’s premiere boutique for all things antique and secondhand. Find vintage leather clutches and bags alongside baby toys, kitchenware, printed stationery, and more.

The kooky sister establishment to bar Plan B, Bily Kun hangs mounted ostrich heads along its 20-foot-high walls by way of decoration.

One of the five largest film festivals in North America, the two-week Vancouver International Film Festival (VIFF) was first founded in 1982.

Explore the four biospheres here; the Atlantic puffin exhibit is a favorite.

Admission: Adults: $16 adults; Seniors: $12; Kids 5–7: $8; Kids 2–4: $2.50.

Every treatment on the menu at this full-service spa lists a duration time—so you’ll know exactly how much pampering you can squeeze in before your plane takes off.

Quebec’s answer to American Apparel—a source for eco-friendly basics like perfectly fitting tees and baby-soft hoodies, all made in the province.

The festival glorifies all things Gaelic with traditional dances, workshops (learn to step-dance), and language classes (did you know that am foghar is Gaelic for "autumn"?).

This short-haul ferry service/mini tour offers an easy and inexpensive way to take in Vancouver's False Creek waterfront with stops in trendy Yaletown and the foodie Mecca Granville Island Market.

LeFort's hooked portraits of Jackie Kennedy and various Canadian prime ministers are astonishing in their obsessiveness, as is her 80-square-foot depiction of the Resurrection, which required eight miles of yarn and two million stitches, and is shown in a gallery with piped-in Gregorian chants.

It’s great fun to watch the takeoffs and landings of Vancouver’s numerous floatplanes (which locals use for quick transport to Victoria—B.C.’s provincial capital—and regional islands). It’s much more entertaining, though, to actually sightsee from one.

What this Hermès boutique in the Vancouver International Airport lacks in size, it makes up for in the grand quality of its signature scarves, small bags, leather goods, and blankets.

At 1,815-feet and 5-inches, the CN Tower is the world's tallest free-standing tower (defined as a building where less than 50% of the construction is usable floor space).