Canada

Things to do in Canada

If you’re visiting Toronto, take a helicopter tour of Niagara Falls for a bird’s eye view of the magnificent Horseshoe and American Falls. Or hop aboard the Maid of the Mist boat for a closer look (and a few splashes). Once you’re back on dry land, head to the Royal Ontario Museum to check out its huge art collection, or dance the night away at one of the bars at West Queen West. The French province of Québec has some of the most exciting things to do in Canada.

In Montréal, stroll around the Old Port, the perfect setting for people watching and outdoor dining. Dig into its local cuisine–it’s the city with the largest number of restaurants per capita in North America. If you visit Montréal in late June or early July, make sure you snag tickets to the International Jazz Festival. For those who prefer the great outdoors, there are plenty of things to do in Canada. Alberta has gorgeous lakes, rivers and forests for hiking, and is an ideal location for seeing the Northern Lights aboard a dogsled. Mont Tremblant in Québec and Whistler in British Columbia are two of the best ski regions in Canada.

In the Victorian neighborhood of Gastown, this three-story Native American art gallery showcases ceremonial masks and totem poles, limited-edition prints, and bentwood boxes. The beaded moccasins and hand-carved “talking sticks” make for great souvenirs.

What started as a tiny consignment shop in the indie district around King Edward Avenue has grown into the neighborhood’s premiere boutique for all things antique and secondhand. Find vintage leather clutches and bags alongside baby toys, kitchenware, printed stationery, and more.

Canada's biggest airport hosts an average of 32 million passengers, and 400,000 flights per year. Pearson's two terminals, the somewhat confusingly named Terminal 1 and Terminal 3, are connected by the frequently running LINK train.

Sitting like a five-pointed star among The Plains of Abraham and just above Terrasse Dufferin, La Citadelle de Québec is a still-active military base (home to the French-speaking Royal 22nd Regiment) and a complex of buildings and fortifications built circa 1820.

Spend two weeks in a rugged, diverse landscape. Led by a seasoned naturalist, search for the elusive Brown Kiwi on Stewart Island and trek to Westland National Park—a World Heritage Area covered by vast icefields.

For a deeper look at Canadian art, don’t miss the Beaux-Arts museum in the heart of downtown’s Golden Square Mile.

Olympic Pedigree: Home to rowing events in the 1976 Games, and one of the largest artificial outdoor rowing facilities in North America.

 

The brewing tradition is alive and well in Quebec, nowhere more so than at this excellent, nothing-but-the-basics microbrewery just a few blocks east of Laurier’s tony boutiques—far enough away, that is, to maintain its authenticity.

Where It Is: Lake Huron’s icy waters preserve sunken ships for decades with little disturbance. Fathom Five Marine Park, a land and water reserve on Lake Huron’s Georgian Bay at the end of the Bruce Peninsula, is a four-hour drive north of Toronto.

A well-dressed, 40-is-the-new-30 crowd gathers nightly at this slick lounge, set along Yaletown’s trendiest shopping strip.

Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky captures the world’s industrially changed landscape—orange nickel tailings flowing like lava over Ontario fields, tires piled by the thousands in rural California.

Flanked by art galleries, this design shop carries covetable goods at reason-able prices—handwoven baby alpaca throws from $186 and mouth-blown glass candleholders for a mere $10.

Most trips take expert planning, and even more so in the challenging Arctic Circle environment. Trusted by Disney, IMAX, and National Geographic, Arctic Kingdom has built a decade-long reputation for small-group, safari-style wildlife viewing, backed up with expert planning and logistics.