Canada

Restaurants in Canada

Locally sourced seafood, a perfect patio, and white-linen service define this snappy spot on the seawall at False Creek.

A secret marinade and wood-charcoal grilling make the Portuguese barbecued chicken Rotisserie Portugalia's signature dish. The chicken has a loyal following and must be ordered an hour in advance.

Located at the Four Seasons Vancouver, this full-service restaurant serves globally influenced Pacific Northwest cuisine from executive chef Ned Bell, whose childhood in the Okanagan Valley inspired a passion for regionally sourced ingredients.

Lee

From his humble beginnings in a Hong Kong hotel kitchen, chef Susur Lee now brings his internationally-known talents to LEE restaurant in the King West neighborhood. Inside, the restaurant boasts bright red walls, candle lit tables, and floor-to-ceiling windows.

Located in the city's Mile End district, Jun-I serves fresh fish and inventive Japanese-style dishes from namesake chef Junichi Ikematsu.

The inn is best known—and deservedly so—for its restaurant, where chef Sam Benedetto works wonders using almost exclusively island ingredients: that means no olive oil, no citrus, no produce that can’t be grown in the inn’s expansive garden.

A nod to “the Beach,” a hippie-turned-yuppie Toronto nabe on the shores of Lake Ontario, this café has a wide-ranging menu—think spicy Thai soup, curried chicken tikka masala, and expertly muddled mojitos.

Set among Vieux-Montréal’s cobblestoned lanes, this eatery is marked only by the antler-and-fish crest hanging outside the door (appropriate, since chasse et pêche means “hunting and fishing”).

Cardero’s large harborside patio—with its unimpeded views of Stanley Park, the Coast Mountains, and seaplanes landing just offshore—may be Vancouver’s loveliest alfresco dining spot.

A maritime-style tavern filled with acres of worn wood, flickering oil lamps, and a winningly retro vibe (tableside Caesar salad service; a pianist playing “Theme from St. Elsewhere”).

If you think you love the New York bagel, your loyalty might be tested by Montreal’s small, dense, and sweet version of the boiled classic. The best place to sample them lies beyond the perpetually steamed windows of this tiny storefront, whose owners have been turning out bagels since 1919.