Canada

Restaurants in Canada

Restaurants in Canada offer excellent seafood, taking full advantage of the country’s vast coastal areas. Canadians can also be thanked for the creation of poutine, a hearty combo of French fries, gravy and cheese curds, as well as Montréal-style bagels, which are boiled in honey-sweetened water and baked in a wood-fired oven.

If you’re in Vancouver, don’t miss the Blue Water Café, a Yaletown district restaurant that has a solid reputation for seafood. Scallops, salmon, crab, cod and sturgeon, among many other seafood staples, are delivered to the restaurant daily, ensuring absolute freshness in whatever you decide to eat.

Toronto has one of the most popular Canadian restaurants: 360, the revolving dining room at the CN Tower. Elevated at more than 351 meters, this eatery offers seasonal menus and a spectacular view of the city. For casual waterfront dining in Winnipeg, head to the Beachcomber, a relaxed space featuring tapas like crab cakes and spring rolls, and generous entrées such as filet mignon, bison short ribs and seafood paella.

Some 100 miles north of Toronto, Michael Stadtlander’s singular retreat serves a tasting menu nightly to fewer than a dozen diners, who bring their own wine, pay in cash, and enjoy the French-inflected bounty of the 100-acre farm.

Located in a former warehouse, Blue Water Café serves fresh regional seafood in an industrial-chic dining room designed with exposed ceiling ducts, large wooden pillars, and brick walls lined with original artwork.

This unusual eatery off historic Blood Alley is trendy even for Gastown, with a bare-bones constellation of menu items changed daily and displayed on a giant chalkboard.

Happy hour starts at noon at this 12-seat luncheonette.

Part of Glowbal Group’s ever-expanding empire (which also includes Sanafir and Coast) this downtown Italian restaurant is a popular choice for both business lunches and group dinners.

Located in the historic Queen West area of Toronto, Czehoski restaurant and lounge is housed inside a 19th century building with a faded wooden sign out front dating back to 1924 — but don’t be fooled by the stark exterior.

Chef-owners Frédéric Morin and David McMillan are the mavericks behind Joe Beef, a delightfully disheveled counterpoint to the city’s often overstyled restaurants.

Skip the airport’s multiple Starbucks outposts in favor of this homegrown Canadian coffee chain (founded in Ontario in 1964).

Rotisserie Romados is known for its wood-charcoal-grilled Portuguese chicken served under a mountain of French fries. At the small corner restaurant, which opened in 1994, cooks use a paintbrush to drizzle the chicken, rice, and seasoned fries with spiced chili oil.

Chef-owner Earlene Busch will whip up a four-course meal, including a surprisingly good dessert of cheesecake with chanterelle sauce.

Madona, one of the city's original cheap-pizza joints, serves its 99-cent slices until the early-morning hours. Located on a busy stretch of Saint-Laurent where the “The Main” intersects pedestrian Prince Arthur Street, the pizzeria is close to bars and nightclubs.