Canada

Restaurants in Canada

Restaurants in Canada offer excellent seafood, taking full advantage of the country’s vast coastal areas. Canadians can also be thanked for the creation of poutine, a hearty combo of French fries, gravy and cheese curds, as well as Montréal-style bagels, which are boiled in honey-sweetened water and baked in a wood-fired oven.

If you’re in Vancouver, don’t miss the Blue Water Café, a Yaletown district restaurant that has a solid reputation for seafood. Scallops, salmon, crab, cod and sturgeon, among many other seafood staples, are delivered to the restaurant daily, ensuring absolute freshness in whatever you decide to eat.

Toronto has one of the most popular Canadian restaurants: 360, the revolving dining room at the CN Tower. Elevated at more than 351 meters, this eatery offers seasonal menus and a spectacular view of the city. For casual waterfront dining in Winnipeg, head to the Beachcomber, a relaxed space featuring tapas like crab cakes and spring rolls, and generous entrées such as filet mignon, bison short ribs and seafood paella.

Cardero’s large harborside patio—with its unimpeded views of Stanley Park, the Coast Mountains, and seaplanes landing just offshore—may be Vancouver’s loveliest alfresco dining spot.

A maritime-style tavern filled with acres of worn wood, flickering oil lamps, and a winningly retro vibe (tableside Caesar salad service; a pianist playing “Theme from St. Elsewhere”).

If you think you love the New York bagel, your loyalty might be tested by Montreal’s small, dense, and sweet version of the boiled classic. The best place to sample them lies beyond the perpetually steamed windows of this tiny storefront, whose owners have been turning out bagels since 1919.

Set among Vieux-Montréal’s cobblestoned lanes, this eatery is marked only by the antler-and-fish crest hanging outside the door (appropriate, since chasse et pêche means “hunting and fishing”).

Stop in for affordable fare, including beef and Provençal fish stews and build-your-own sandwiches.

Situated on Harbord Street’s burgeoning restaurant row, this small eatery serves an eclectic, globally inspired menu that incorporates regional ingredients.

Situated on an ancient cobblestoned street in the Old Port district, this casual French bistro is often packed with locals throughout the day. Inside, the restaurant is decorated with parquet floors, built-in wooden cabinets, large mirrors, and tentacle-like chandeliers with exposed bulbs.

Liverpool House sits next-door-but-one to sibling restaurant Joe Beef and serves market-sourced dishes cooked in French and Italian styles.

Set along a quiet side street between the bustling Old Port and Rue St.-Jean districts, Chez Temporel has been a haven for affordable breakfasts, lunches, and café au lait bowls since the mid-70's.

"The Black Hoof is a great, no-frills charcuterie restaurant where everything is cured on the premises. The crowd is super-young and hip, and there's a terrific wine list and really good cocktails-a number of which are made with rums imported from Cuba.

ONE

A mecca for well-to-do Canadian socialites and international celebrities, gold rims nearly everything at One Restaurant in Yorkville, bill included.

Greek seafood restaurant Milos opened in Montreal in 1979 and was chef-owner Costas Spiliadis’ first eatery, preceding locations in New York, Athens, and Las Vegas. Fresh seafood ranges from sardines and octopus to Gulf shrimp and red snapper—all served with olive oil pressed by Spiliadis’ sister

This neighborhood bistro hits all the marks of Nouvelle Montréal cuisine: taxidermy in the dining room, chalkboard of nose-to-tail specials, and scruffy hipster chefs in baseball caps.