Canada

Restaurants in Canada

The Poutine (fries with gravy and cheese) come in 25 varieties starting at $4.00.

Located just around the corner from Pacific Theatre, West is often lauded as one of the best fine-dining restaurants in the city.

Opened in 1998 as a bakery but then expanded into a café, Olive & Gourmando has a menu of sandwiches served on homemade bread, pastries encasing Valrhona chocolate, and housemade ricotta.

Aurora Restaurant looks out over Bedwell Harbour, and—fittingly—serves West Coast cuisine in a dining room decorated with blue tones and nautical touches like a deep-sea diving helmet.

Back in 1989, three University of British Columbia students banded together to bring oversized 24-inch pizzas to Vancouver’s hungry masses. This location, one of more than a dozen now in operation, is located in the International Terminal of the Vancouver Airport.

French cuisine made largely using produce grown within a 10-mile radius.

Located in the Mile End area, Wilensky’s Light Lunch serves unfussy sandwiches and fountain sodas. Opened in 1932, the restaurant was made an icon by Mordecai Richler’s The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz (1959).

Opened in 1928, this kosher-style Jewish deli marinates its meat for 10 full days before hot-smoking it. The preservative-free beef brisket (similar to pastrami) is ordered by the fat content: either fat, medium-fat, medium, or lean.

Stop for a latte and ham and cheese omelette at this café in a converted train station on the rail path.

Set in Montreal’s Little Italy, home to a large Italian population since the 19th-century, Caffe San Simeon has been making espresso, lattes, and cappuccinos since 1996. An Italian flag hangs in the window of the café, which serves drinks in colorful espresso cups and tall glass tumblers.

Rob Feenie, who worked for both Daniel Boulud and Jean-Georges Vongerichten, puts a French spin on the Anglo-Americanisms of Canadian cuisine at Lumière, the nation's first freestanding Relais Gourmand restaurant.

The place to go, for a rosy filet mignon with a blue-cheese sauce.

Part Indian restaurant and part ethnic market, this popular stop-in in Fairview is a moderately priced alternative to Rangoli's next-door 'world renowned' VJ's Restaurant.

Chef An’s dishes are based on traditional Thai recipes and focus on four flavor profiles – hot, sour, sweet, and salty. The chef’s menu allows diners to try five or more savory dishes like steamed mussels with lemongrass and Thai basil or Fraser Valley duck curry.

At this loungey locale, Chef Alex Rolland's duck breast with Japanese eggplant and black cherry sauce is a perfect stand-in for Christmas goose.