Canada

Restaurants in Canada

The Saint-Jean-Baptiste neighborhood is filled with interesting budget-friendly shops, bars, and restaurants, and Le Comptoir is among its best offerings. Just steps away from the Old City, the restaurant serves impeccably made classics such as smoked-meat sandwiches and fish and chips.

This cafeteria-style lunch spot at the Old Port’s public market (Marché du Vieux-Port) serves dishes under $10 that are made with local ingredients provided by the market’s producers. The seasonal menu was created by Arnaud Marchand, chef at the popular Upper Town bistro Chez Boulay.

La Korrigane is a brewery that produces its beers in very small quantities and serves them exclusively in its lively pub. In addition to traditional blends, the brewery also uses ingredients such as fresh blueberries and maple sap to produce intriguingly complex beers.

Quebec City’s only authentic ramen joint is run by two Japanese brothers (who also own an excellent sushi restaurant in Limoilou). Passing through the restaurant’s door, diners are transported straight to Tokyo with a welcoming shout from the staff of “Irasshaimase!” and brisk, no-fuss service.

On Limoilou’s trendy 3rd avenue, Soupe & Cie serves instant comfort to its hungry patrons. The restaurant’s piping-hot soups are inspired by international classics, such as Italian wedding soup, New England-style clam chowder, and French bouillabaisse.

This small, family restaurant serves aromatic Salvadorian and Mexican dishes that are guaranteed to warm up even the coldest winter evenings.

Quebec City’s only authentic ramen joint is run by two Japanese brothers (who also own an excellent sushi restaurant in Limoilou) Passing through the restaurant’s door, diners are transported straight to Tokyo with a welcoming shout from the staff of “Irasshaimase!” and brisk, no-fuss service.

Like most Indian restaurants, Shahi Tandori has an extensive menu. There are over 60 dishes, and the chefs manage to master them all. The specialty is, of course, tandoor-grilled meats and seafood, but the whole array of curries, vegetarian dishes, appetizers and breads provide a sensory lift.

Bati Bassak’s enduring popularity doesn’t lie: locals return again and again to revel in the restaurant’s authentic Thai and Cambodian culinary fare, which lifts the lid on rich aromas and harmonious flavor combinations.

When Le Mezze opened, Quebec City’s gourmands let out a sigh of relief: Finally, an authentic Greek restaurant! The taverna is owned and managed by a charming couple whose traditionally hospitality makes diners feel they are being welcomed into a home.

A well-liked local hideout, Pub Galway sits off the tourist-beaten path on rue Cartier.

When you want to watch televised sport events, Pub du Parvis is one of the liveliest spots to go to; though small, the pub has several screens where matches are shown to crowds of fans.

A block away from Place Royale, the city’s historic settlement, L’Oncle Antoine’s unique character invites a mixed clientele of both locals and visitors. The pub is located in the stone cellar of one of the city’s oldest houses (which dates back to 1754).

A newcomer on Grande-Allée, this laid-back tavern is a welcome addition to an area more usually known for its better-dressed restaurants and bars.

This 25-year-old, English-style pub serves one of the city’s widest selection of beers from Quebec and around the world—two dozen on tap and over 200 bottled varieties, (including exclusive private imports).