Canada

Restaurants in Canada

Rotisserie Romados is known for its wood-charcoal-grilled Portuguese chicken served under a mountain of French fries. At the small corner restaurant, which opened in 1994, cooks use a paintbrush to drizzle the chicken, rice, and seasoned fries with spiced chili oil.

Part of Glowbal Group’s ever-expanding empire (which also includes Sanafir and Coast) this downtown Italian restaurant is a popular choice for both business lunches and group dinners.

Located in the historic Queen West area of Toronto, Czehoski restaurant and lounge is housed inside a 19th century building with a faded wooden sign out front dating back to 1924 — but don’t be fooled by the stark exterior.

Chef-owners Frédéric Morin and David McMillan are the mavericks behind Joe Beef, a delightfully disheveled counterpoint to the city’s often overstyled restaurants.

Skip the airport’s multiple Starbucks outposts in favor of this homegrown Canadian coffee chain (founded in Ontario in 1964).

For eight years, chef Laurent Godbout has been putting a delicious spin on classics (try his pan-seared sea bass with squid-ink risotto, scallops, and a chorizo cream sauce) in this Old Montreal dining room—and he hasn’t missed a beat yet.

Chef-owner Earlene Busch will whip up a four-course meal, including a surprisingly good dessert of cheesecake with chanterelle sauce.

Madona, one of the city's original cheap-pizza joints, serves its 99-cent slices until the early-morning hours. Located on a busy stretch of Saint-Laurent where the “The Main” intersects pedestrian Prince Arthur Street, the pizzeria is close to bars and nightclubs.

Vancouverites are coffee connoisseurs, and they’ve been lining up for lattes (all made with a signature leaf pattern topping the steamed milk) at this homegrown café since 2000.

The waterfront gastropub Spinnakers serves creamy Fanny Bay oysters, rich seafood chowder, and the pub’s own ESB cask ale, served on a deck overlooking the harbor.

Opened in 2007, Les Cons Servent is a play on words, alluding to the bistro's home-canned preserves, conserves, and pickles that are stacked on ceiling-high shelves in the gray-tone dining room.

Once as a small family restaurant in Toronto and now a fast food chain, Veda presents a new approach to fast food by serving slow-cooked Indian cuisine in a fast-paced environment.