Canada

Hotels in Canada

Deep in the Selkirk Mountains, Nelsen Lodge at Revelstoke Mountain Resort debuts with 59 rustic suites in February of 2009 (162 more are slated to open later this year) and is just 10 steps from the longest lift-serviced descent in North America, at 5,620 feet.

A formerly gritty Holiday Inn, the property fits right into rapidly gentrifying St.-Roch. Interiors are awash in charcoal grays and stark whites, with graffiti-inspired art, mod Japanese soaking tubs, and windows that look out onto surrounding steeples.

This luxury boutique, conveniently located in Toronto's financial district and close to PATH, the world’s largest subterranean shopping center, blends the best elements of a spa with simple yet elegant suites and common spaces.

Metrosexual to the max—starting with the model-hot doormen—the Opus packs in guests who want to sample the city’s trendiest neighborhood.

This 62-room, 15-suite, boutique hotel opened in the city's ritziest mixed-use neighborhood, midtown's Yorkville, in summer 2009.

Try the caribou in a berry glaze with mashed sweet potato in the woodsy hotel restaurant.

Gaze out at the white-capped peaks of Banff National Park. Ski packages include lift tickets, equipment rental, and lessons at three nearby resorts.

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“Roughing it” at Clayoquot should appeal to even the most dedicated sybarite. A floatplane brings guests from Vancouver to a secluded compound hugging a spruce- and cedar-shaded shore.

Set on an island that is fully encircled by mountain peaks, the 24-cabin lodge is as remote today as it was when it was built in 1902. Guests do not have easy access to TV’s or the Internet, and most rooms are outfitted with balconies overlooking the water.

In the quaint town of Ontario’s Niagara-on-the-Lake, a 30-minute drive from the Niagara Falls, you’ll find Harbour House, a three-story, shingle-clad property with river views.

Built in 1723 and originally used as a fur warehouse, the stone building in Old Montreal is now the elegant Auberge Les Passants du Sans Soucy. The lobby does double duty as an art gallery exhibiting work by Québécois artists, and a fireplace warms the communal sitting room.