Canada

Things to do in Canada

If you’re visiting Toronto, take a helicopter tour of Niagara Falls for a bird’s eye view of the magnificent Horseshoe and American Falls. Or hop aboard the Maid of the Mist boat for a closer look (and a few splashes). Once you’re back on dry land, head to the Royal Ontario Museum to check out its huge art collection, or dance the night away at one of the bars at West Queen West. The French province of Québec has some of the most exciting things to do in Canada.

In Montréal, stroll around the Old Port, the perfect setting for people watching and outdoor dining. Dig into its local cuisine–it’s the city with the largest number of restaurants per capita in North America. If you visit Montréal in late June or early July, make sure you snag tickets to the International Jazz Festival. For those who prefer the great outdoors, there are plenty of things to do in Canada. Alberta has gorgeous lakes, rivers and forests for hiking, and is an ideal location for seeing the Northern Lights aboard a dogsled. Mont Tremblant in Québec and Whistler in British Columbia are two of the best ski regions in Canada.

Between Jacques-Cartier and Clock Tower quays in the Old Port, the Patinoire du Bassin Bonsecours is a scenic outdoor skating rink along the St. Lawrence River. Each evening, from December to mid-March, a DJ plays music in styles ranging from classical to 1980’s hits.

After exploring Old Montreal, save time for a walk through Frederick Law Olmsted’s wooded and sprawling, 470-odd-acre Mont-Royal Park, which spans the northern edge of downtown and forms the western border of the Plateau Mont-Royal neighborhood.

Vancouver’s enviable natural setting places this annual fireworks “competition” above most others in the world. International teams light up the sky over English Bay with the latest and greatest in fireworks, all set to music (the soundtrack is also broadcast on local radio).

What Lies Beneath: At first glance Montreal does not appear to be overcrowded, but maybe that’s because everyone is underground.

Spread across 180 acres just a couple of miles east of downtown, the
nearly 80-year-old botanical garden is brilliantly landscaped and full
of surprises. Sure, there are the showstopping Rose Gardens, along with

Travel agent Maria Guerrieri has helped Linden Travel develop into one of the most well-known travel agencies in New York. Located on Third Avenue in the Turtle Bay neighborhood, this agency was established in 1969 and merged with Frosch Travel in order to offer even more comprehensive service.

North America’s oldest corporation—established in 1670!—Hudson’s Bay Company (known locally as just The Bay) has long been known for its iconic, cream-colored wool blankets, boldly striped in yellow, red, navy, and green.

This three-year public outdoor art installation—on the airport grounds and easily visible on the drive to and from the terminals—includes large-scale sculptures by Michel de Broin, Carl Skelton, and Ilan Sandler.

This Prohibition-era inspired restaurant and bar overlooks the Maple Tree Square section of historic Gastown. Owned by a handful of bartending veterans, the intimate, neighborhood venue serves Asian-influenced small plates like bánh mì and gyoza.

Designed by New York architect James O’Donnell, the Gothic Revival-style Notre-Dame Basilica faces Place d'Armes in Old Montreal. Although completed in 1829, the church later added its two towers a decade later—the western tower holds one giant bell and the eastern a 10-bell carillon.

Wearable art from B.C. designers and Norway's Oleana.

This ethnic enclave filled with Hasidic, Portuguese, Italian, and Greek communities has been immortalized in the novels of Mordecai Richler, who grew up here and returned often in his books.

The Plains of Abraham is one of Canada’s most scenic monuments, as well as hallowed ground for French and British soldiers who fought and died there during the 1759 Battle of Quebec. Overlooking the wide St.

Entering the stylish Whisky Lounge is a little like stepping (one imagines) into a Havana lounge, circa 1952. It’s not just the real Cuban cigars—you’re in Canada, after all—being sold and smoked in the clubby back-room salon.