Restaurants in California

There’s a lot to like about a superior sushi joint disguised as a hole in wall and located next door to a 7-Eleven. As under the radar as LA sushi gets, this restaurant on Beverly is the genuine article.

Housed in a 1903 military barrack, the Presidio Social Club restaurant combines original furnishings, such as stainless-steel medicine cabinets now used as liquor storage, with contemporary design elements.

Organic, ciabatta-crust pizzas and homemade pastas reign at this earthy Laurel Canyon eatery that once housed Café Galleria (a ‘60s spot hosting open-mike nights for neighborhood locals).

European-style deli meets Japanese cuisine in Delica rf1 at the San Francisco Ferry Building.

Enjoy blue-agave tequilas and Mexican cuisine at Tres on Townsend Street in the SoMa District. Its brick façade features a trio of agave plants above the arched doorway.

In 1986, Alsace-native Hubert Keller, after years of mentorship from culinary masters like Paul Bocuse, became executive chef and partner in this contemporary French restaurant in Union Square.

Order the barbecued-chicken pizza at this local favorite of everyone from grandmas to surfer dudes.

The Italian restaurant features a large live tree inside.

Dine at Michel Richard’s Citronelle, at the Carmel Valley Ranch resort—and be sure to order the Monterey Bay abalone with caviar cream.

Located in a residential neighborhood, this restaurant serves California cuisine with global influences, many of them Moroccan.

"Charlie Chaplin slept here" is a frequentand often untrueSoCal refrain, but it's apt at the Montecito Inn, which the famous actor built in the 1920s.

Stop in Three Rivers on your way in or out of the park for a French dip sandwich.

Housed in a small, narrow building, this neighborhood bistro serves locally inspired French cuisine along with a selection of exclusively Sonoma wines.

Caterers Bill Dertouzo and partner Susan McAlindon sell cupcakes in striped boxes with inner rings to hold the confections in place. You can even get a box for one. But unless it's a gift, a single rarely makes it out the door.