Hotels in California

Within walking distance of historic old town, restaurants, and museums, the Westin Pasadena offers 350 rooms, just 12 miles north of Los Angeles. From the mosaic reflecting pool out front to the heated rooftop pool, this 12-story property includes numerous relaxation options.

The Madonna Inn California has 110 themed rooms, ranging from the Caveman Room (think animal prints) to the Yahoo Room (cowboy, not Internet). It’s all tongue-in-cheek fun, including the garish hot-pink steakhouse.

Venice Beach is one of the most iconic spots on the West coast, and there are few ways to experience it better than by biking or skating.

This 62-room Napa Valley newcomer is raising the bar on green design. Built almost exclusively from salvaged stone and reclaimed wood, it’s one of four LEED Platinum–certified hotels in the U.S.

This airy inn on Healdsburg’s plaza dates to 1901. Many rooms have canary yellow walls, curtained windows, and contain gas fireplaces and a jetted spa bathtub. Prime rooms face the plaza, but deluxe Kings in back share a welcoming balcony.

There is simply no way to get any closer to the ocean in San Diego than staying at the Crystal Pier Hotel. The white cottages with blue trim sit directly above the crashing waves of the ocean on the wide pier that stretches out past Pacific Beach.

Meet friends or colleagues at the Westin St. Francis’ famous 1907 Magneta grandfather clock. The hotel’s 1904 Landmark building and 32-story 1971 Tower building overlook San Francisco’s Union Square.

Opened in 2008, The Resort at Pelican Hill redefined the upscale Orange County enclave of Newport Beach as a world-class destination.

Even after a $53 million renovation in 2008, this timber lodge edging Lake Tahoe manages to let nature do the talking.

With just three rooms, the Poetry Inn is one of the most tranquil spaces in the buzzing Napa Valley. Owned by the eponymous founder of the Cliff Lede Vineyards, this intimate inn gets everything right.

A head-to-toe renovation in 2009 perked up this plush high-rise; rooms have floor-to-ceiling windows, black granite credenzas, and Eames chairs. 

Located downtown, the Hideaway was designed by Herbert Burns as the city’s first traditional motor inn. Although it retains much of its original 1947 style, the single-level motel underwent a full renovation in 2002.