California

Hotels in California

Test the waters in the spa at Miracle Manor Retreat, set atop geothermal springs. It's a worthy splurge after a day spent hiking the otherworldly landscape of nearby Joshua Tree National Park.

Located across the street from the beach in downtown Avalon, this hotel has Mediterranean touches like green-and-white striped awnings, a terra cotta roof, and a quiet sun deck for guests.

Located in a century-old building in the SoMa district, the Good Hotel is a 117-room boutique property billed as the first “hotel with a conscience.” Decorated with cuckoo clocks and photos of past guests (taken in the on-site photo booth), the colorful lobby contains furniture made with repurpos

This knotty-pine heaven right on the lakefront (complete with a beach and its own marina and restaurant) includes 41 cabins (rented by the week) and 26 cheerfully retro rooms in the circa 1926 lodge.

223-room hotel filled with gilded antiques, chandeliers, and 18th-century tapestries.

Adjacent to a man-made trout lake where old Hollywood celebrities like Clark Gable used to fish, this five-story, country-style hotel was built in 1962. Renovated in 2009, the property is comprised of six acres of gardens and koi ponds.

A rope swing—dangling from an oak tree just outside the lobby—signifies the youthful aesthetic: what was once a gray-haired golf resort just east of Carmel is now a sprawling outpost well-suited for families, and couples too.

This Spanish-inspired hotel, built around a large courtyard filled with blooming bougainvillea, takes full advantage of its stellar city and mountain views.

When the honchos from LVMH and Neiman Marcus come to town, the 110-room Campton Place is where they stay. The hotel is on the preferred (i.e., east) side of Union Square, convenient to their SF stores yet insulated from tourists and the dodgy Tenderloin.

Designed as an ode to Palm Springs in its Golden Age, when celebrities like Humphrey Bogart visited, this Hollywood-Regency style hotel occupies four acres.

This 19-story hotel was constructed in 1926 on the same site as the preexisting mansion of Mark Hopkins, a tycoon who created the Central Pacific Railroad.

The stone-and-cedar lodge, set 7,200 feet above sea level, is Sequoia’s best rustic hideaway. Built in 1999, the 102 rooms are a bit cookie-cutter but sport vaguely Mission-style furnishings and cushy beds.