Burlington + Northern Vermont

Burlington + Northern Vermont Travel Guide

Find out what’s underwater at this interactive science museum; there are more than 70 species featured in ever-changing exhibits. It also hosts an adult-friendly cocktail party called ECHO After Dark on the second Thursday of every month.

Behind its iconic marquee, the city’s largest theater has served many roles since opening in 1930 as a vaudeville house.

For quaintness, few places breathe more New England rusticity than the Warren Country Store in central Vermont.

Visitors can watch as Ulrike Tessmer throws and fires her sturdy, traditional stoneware, a trade she learned in Hamburg.

Located on the Burlington Bay waterfront, this unusual shop is part of the Peace & Justice Center, a nonprofit organization that promotes human rights, racial justice, and economic equality.

Kayak, hike, bike, learn to row, explore on horseback, run in wide-open spaces with sweeping views. It’s all accessible through this center, which offers sculling and running camps as well as bike, boat, and kayak rentals.

A lesser-known attraction in the area, the Perkins Geology Museum is located on the campus of the University of Vermont.

This annual 10-mile cross-country skiing event starts on the summit of 4,393-foot Mount Mansfield, the state's highest peak, and winds up in the village of Stowe, an architectural rival of Woodstock.

The five-story converted firehouse has rotating art exhibitions every fall.

Inspired by Middlebury College professor John Freidin’s passion for cycling, VBT began as an open invitation to fellow bikers to join Freidin on his many rides throughout Vermont.

With the highest number of breweries in the country per capita, Vermont is known for its beer. One of its oldest sits alongside Otter Creek in Middlebury and offers free guided tours of the brewing and bottling process (albeit through large windows).

At the Hort Farm (as it’s locally known), students from the University of Vermont have conducted biological research for more than 60 years. At present, the 97-acre facility hosts experimental apple orchards, grape vines, ornamental shrubbery, flower gardens, and a bat house.

While the advent of the indoor shopping mall in the 1970's meant the death of most pedestrian malls, this one—established in 1981—still buzzes with activity.