Buenos Aires

Restaurants in Buenos Aires

Beef is usually the first thing that comes to mind when thinking of Buenos Aires restaurants, and with good reason: Argentina’s prairies produce some of the best cuts in the world. But local cuisine also boasts European influences, and modern, inventive twists. Some of the best restaurants in Buenos Aires offer “tenedor libre” service, an all-you-can-eat buffet of appetizers, meats, salads and desserts. Modern Argentinian cuisine is served in a refined atmosphere at Casa Cruz, one of the most popular Buenos Aires restaurants. The unmarked entrance leads to a low-lit space where chef German Martegui serves specialties like foie gras crème brulee, grilled octopus and Argentinian veal tenderloin. At Sucre, chef Gonzalo Sacot interprets Argentinian classics with Italian, Spanish and even Japanese touches. Expect octopus tiradito, organic fried chicken and hearty cuts like Black Angus tenderloin, cooked in a wood-fired grill, plus a comprehensive list of national wines. For a French-inspired menu, head to Chila, a trendy eatery featuring tasting menus built around seasonal ingredients like quail, shrimp and fresh goat cheese. Chila has been honored with multiple awards, including Best Restaurant from Cuisine & Vins magazine in 2011.

One of the joys of dining in Buenos Aires is that virtually any restaurant with a grill can crank out the best beef you’ve ever tasted. This no-frills parrilla is a perfect example of scrumptious simplicity.

An unmarked doorway in Villa Crespo conceals Almacén Secreto, the private kingdom of chef Abigail Machicado, who prepares dishes from Argentina's south (venison raviolones), center (oven-baked Paraná River fish), and north (charquisillo, a stew made with cured meat).

This 1954 stalwart on a hard-to-find street in La Boca serves up nostalgia alongside plump steaks, tortillas de papa, and shared tureens of homey soup. Yes, that is a photo of Bono and Francis Ford Coppola on the wall.

Here’s a nook once loved by Jorge Luis Borges. Over there, a table favored by tango singer Carlos Gardel. Here, your café con crema comes surrounded by history. Order the tostado especial Tortoni, the world’s biggest yet lightest grilled cheese, ham, and tomato sandwich.

Not more than a kick of a fútbol from the Boca Juniors stadium, and as brightly colored as a Caminito house, Il Mattarello is the gritty barrio’s best known Italian cantina.

Located in the trendy Palermo Soho district, this restaurant serves super-sized portions of Argentine steak to an often-packed house. Beef is served on wood boards, with one order ample enough for two people.

This bright, colorful Spanish chain serves up some of the airport’s healthiest fast food.

A refreshing alternative to the city’s ubiquitous steakhouses, Oviedo is a Spanish-inspired seafood restaurant in the Recoleta neighborhood. Inside, glass orb chandeliers illuminate the dining room, which is decorated with dark mahogany trim, classic white tablecloths, and ocean-themed artwork.

Palermo’s new hidden gem, helmed by a pair of young chefs whose résumés include stints at such avant-garde temples as Fat Duck and Mugaritz. The daily-changing blackboard lunch menus are breezy affairs, featuring decadent risottos of the day and locavore salads.

Dine on entrecôte and sip Malbec while dancers perform moves such as boleos and gaunchos at Esquina Carlos Gardel, the city's top dinner club—and one of Gardel's old haunts.

Located in the affluent Puerto Madero neighborhood and within walking distance of a handful of high-end hotel chains, this steakhouse serves the usual lineup of Argentinean parilla beef, principally to tourists.

Located in the Palermo Viejo district, Azema Exotic Bistro serves an innovative fusion of Creole, Caribbean, Vietnamese, and French cuisines.

Persicco serves what’s often considered the best ice cream in Buenos Aires, so the new airport outpost of this Italian-style gelatería is a pre-departure must-do.