Buenos Aires

Restaurants in Buenos Aires

Beef is usually the first thing that comes to mind when thinking of Buenos Aires restaurants, and with good reason: Argentina’s prairies produce some of the best cuts in the world. But local cuisine also boasts European influences, and modern, inventive twists. Some of the best restaurants in Buenos Aires offer “tenedor libre” service, an all-you-can-eat buffet of appetizers, meats, salads and desserts. Modern Argentinian cuisine is served in a refined atmosphere at Casa Cruz, one of the most popular Buenos Aires restaurants. The unmarked entrance leads to a low-lit space where chef German Martegui serves specialties like foie gras crème brulee, grilled octopus and Argentinian veal tenderloin. At Sucre, chef Gonzalo Sacot interprets Argentinian classics with Italian, Spanish and even Japanese touches. Expect octopus tiradito, organic fried chicken and hearty cuts like Black Angus tenderloin, cooked in a wood-fired grill, plus a comprehensive list of national wines. For a French-inspired menu, head to Chila, a trendy eatery featuring tasting menus built around seasonal ingredients like quail, shrimp and fresh goat cheese. Chila has been honored with multiple awards, including Best Restaurant from Cuisine & Vins magazine in 2011.

Don’t expect the same tasty pies from this porteño pizzeria’s Ezeiza location. The Italian menu here is basic, with classic sandwiches (ham and cheese; tomato, basil, and mozzarella, etc.) and overpriced salads. It is also a full coffee shop, with espresso, lattes, and pastries.

Owner Luis Acuna founded El Pobre Luis back in 1986, and the unassuming Núñez parrilla has become one of the city’s most legendary. Poor Lou, as hes called, is credited with first bringing the style of asado (grilled meat) from his native Uruguay to Buenos Aires.

Lost in a time warp amid Palermo’s trendy spots, this classic has retained its original grocery. Eat in the back room with red-checked tablecloths where a mix of old-timers and barrio hipsters order the signature fabada (Spanish bean-and-sausage casserole).

With its huge picture windows, long red banquettes, and curved wood walls, the Standard takes the style of an Edward Hopper 1950s diner (albeit with a less lonely vibe) and updates it with a minimalist, modern look.

This bustling lunchtime favorite among Porteños, who have been crowding the two level space since it first opened in another location in the 1940s.

Hands down the best option for a sit-down dinner, La Pausa serves excellent Argentine cuisine like grilled bife de chorizo (sirloin strip) or four-cheese gnocchi in a spacious, low-lit dining room.

Popular with the A-list set, Casa Cruz is an upscale Argentinean restaurant known for its clubby atmosphere, lively bar scene, and contemporary cuisine. Located in trendy Palermo Soho, the restaurant is marked only by a set of imposing, 16-foot brass doors.

Once a tailor shop, then a deli with a bar, this ur-bodegón is famous for its collection of old vermouth bottles, grilled sardines, and a wine-infused oxtail stew.

One of the classic Buenos Aires pizza joints, El Cuartito started serving Argentina’s famous crusty pizzas in 1934.

Don’t judge yet. This American chain is a different creature in Argentina, having added waiter service and a rather refined atmosphere to its offering of hamburgers and fries. Ezeiza’s new 4,300-square-foot outpost—open 24/7—also serves the only truly affordable fare in the airport.

An esplanade over the Río de la Plata makes this Italian restaurant one of the city's top dining experiences. Mushroom risotto and creamy gnocchi with ham are perfectly al dente.

Located in the center of the Palermo Soho shopping district, this casually chic restaurant serves French-Mediterranean fusion fare along with handcrafted cocktails and local wines from the Mendoza Province.