Buenos Aires

Restaurants in Buenos Aires

An esplanade over the Río de la Plata makes this Italian restaurant one of the city's top dining experiences. Mushroom risotto and creamy gnocchi with ham are perfectly al dente.

Don’t judge yet. This American chain is a different creature in Argentina, having added waiter service and a rather refined atmosphere to its offering of hamburgers and fries. Ezeiza’s new 4,300-square-foot outpost—open 24/7—also serves the only truly affordable fare in the airport.

Although opened in 2001, Social La Lechuza oozes the atmosphere of the best old-school neighborhood parrillas (steak joints).

Dine on entrecôte and sip Malbec while dancers perform moves such as boleos and gaunchos at Esquina Carlos Gardel, the city's top dinner club—and one of Gardel's old haunts.

Located in the affluent Puerto Madero neighborhood and within walking distance of a handful of high-end hotel chains, this steakhouse serves the usual lineup of Argentinean parilla beef, principally to tourists.

Located in the center of the Palermo Soho shopping district, this casually chic restaurant serves French-Mediterranean fusion fare along with handcrafted cocktails and local wines from the Mendoza Province.

Cocina criolla—northern Argentinean flavor—rules at this no-frills, dirt-cheap cult favorite across from the Parque Las Heras. The carne picante (spicy beef) empanada is the juiciest in town, and the carbonada stew teeming with pumpkin and corn spells comfort food.

Stuck in a late-Modernist time warp amid the Microcentro bustle, this 60’s café is for certain media and politico types an office, living room, and caffeine-emergency ward.

Tucked away in Recoleta, this rustic nook with red leatherette booths is home to the town’s best empanadas. Flash-baked to order, the pastries arrive blistered and plump with creamed corn, mozzarella and basil, or hand-chopped beef sweetened with onions.

Located in the Palermo Viejo district, Azema Exotic Bistro serves an innovative fusion of Creole, Caribbean, Vietnamese, and French cuisines.

Persicco serves what’s often considered the best ice cream in Buenos Aires, so the new airport outpost of this Italian-style gelatería is a pre-departure must-do.

In a neighborhood better known for nouvelle cuisine treatments of Argentine food, Pablo Rivero and his parents built Don Julio into a mainstay by presenting top-quality plates of classic parrilla steak-house fare.

The Scene: In steak-mad B.A., a fish- and veggie-focused supper club is a welcome dining option—even better that it’s in the cozy Chacarita neighborhood home of a 33-year-old vegan-leaning chef, Diego Felix, who enchants visitors with indigenous South American ingredients.

Owned by chef Federico Simoes, this Palermo Soho restaurant serves Mediterranean-Argentinean cuisine in a small, understated dining room.