Buenos Aires

Restaurants in Buenos Aires

Beef is usually the first thing that comes to mind when thinking of Buenos Aires restaurants, and with good reason: Argentina’s prairies produce some of the best cuts in the world. But local cuisine also boasts European influences, and modern, inventive twists. Some of the best restaurants in Buenos Aires offer “tenedor libre” service, an all-you-can-eat buffet of appetizers, meats, salads and desserts. Modern Argentinian cuisine is served in a refined atmosphere at Casa Cruz, one of the most popular Buenos Aires restaurants. The unmarked entrance leads to a low-lit space where chef German Martegui serves specialties like foie gras crème brulee, grilled octopus and Argentinian veal tenderloin. At Sucre, chef Gonzalo Sacot interprets Argentinian classics with Italian, Spanish and even Japanese touches. Expect octopus tiradito, organic fried chicken and hearty cuts like Black Angus tenderloin, cooked in a wood-fired grill, plus a comprehensive list of national wines. For a French-inspired menu, head to Chila, a trendy eatery featuring tasting menus built around seasonal ingredients like quail, shrimp and fresh goat cheese. Chila has been honored with multiple awards, including Best Restaurant from Cuisine & Vins magazine in 2011.

This 1954 stalwart on a hard-to-find street in La Boca serves up nostalgia alongside plump steaks, tortillas de papa, and shared tureens of homey soup. Yes, that is a photo of Bono and Francis Ford Coppola on the wall.

Here’s a nook once loved by Jorge Luis Borges. Over there, a table favored by tango singer Carlos Gardel. Here, your café con crema comes surrounded by history. Order the tostado especial Tortoni, the world’s biggest yet lightest grilled cheese, ham, and tomato sandwich.

Hands down the best option for a sit-down dinner, La Pausa serves excellent Argentine cuisine like grilled bife de chorizo (sirloin strip) or four-cheese gnocchi in a spacious, low-lit dining room.

There’s no menu—you just sit down and they bring you food, like ensalada de pulpo. If you see something going by that you like, you just ask for half of it.

Argentines take their empanadas (meat- and vegetable-filled pastries) seriously, and many claim that the tiny, 30-year-old La Cocina has the best around.

Not more than a kick of a fútbol from the Boca Juniors stadium, and as brightly colored as a Caminito house, Il Mattarello is the gritty barrio’s best known Italian cantina.

Located in the trendy Palermo Soho district, this restaurant serves super-sized portions of Argentine steak to an often-packed house. Beef is served on wood boards, with one order ample enough for two people.

Popular with the A-list set, Casa Cruz is an upscale Argentinean restaurant known for its clubby atmosphere, lively bar scene, and contemporary cuisine. Located in trendy Palermo Soho, the restaurant is marked only by a set of imposing, 16-foot brass doors.

Once a tailor shop, then a deli with a bar, this ur-bodegón is famous for its collection of old vermouth bottles, grilled sardines, and a wine-infused oxtail stew.

Chef Jean Paul Bondoux hails from the Bourgogne region of France; in 1993, he opened this restaurant that specializes in cuisine from his homeland, at the Alvear Palace Hotel.

The oak-fueled ovens at Filo churn out wispy, chewy marvels in a nineties-kitsch space steps from Calle Florida. Long-haired diners nibble on elegant arugula-and-Parmesan salads while trying to decide among some three dozen toppings.

This bright, colorful Spanish chain serves up some of the airport’s healthiest fast food.