Buenos Aires

Restaurants in Buenos Aires

Beef is usually the first thing that comes to mind when thinking of Buenos Aires restaurants, and with good reason: Argentina’s prairies produce some of the best cuts in the world. But local cuisine also boasts European influences, and modern, inventive twists. Some of the best restaurants in Buenos Aires offer “tenedor libre” service, an all-you-can-eat buffet of appetizers, meats, salads and desserts. Modern Argentinian cuisine is served in a refined atmosphere at Casa Cruz, one of the most popular Buenos Aires restaurants. The unmarked entrance leads to a low-lit space where chef German Martegui serves specialties like foie gras crème brulee, grilled octopus and Argentinian veal tenderloin. At Sucre, chef Gonzalo Sacot interprets Argentinian classics with Italian, Spanish and even Japanese touches. Expect octopus tiradito, organic fried chicken and hearty cuts like Black Angus tenderloin, cooked in a wood-fired grill, plus a comprehensive list of national wines. For a French-inspired menu, head to Chila, a trendy eatery featuring tasting menus built around seasonal ingredients like quail, shrimp and fresh goat cheese. Chila has been honored with multiple awards, including Best Restaurant from Cuisine & Vins magazine in 2011.

The interiors here are taberna-meets-brasserie, and while the Porteño grilled-beef classics are exemplary, well-heeled Recoleta regulars come for the expertly sizzled parillada de mar (seafood grill).

In otherwise trendy Palermo Hollywood, this brightly lit parrilla is a no-frills affair. But the perfectly prepared bife de lomo (beef tenderloin) and matambrito (pork flank) and low prices keep it packed with locals.

Argentina’s McDonald’s have long featured what America’s Golden Arches are just beginning to add: an attached Starbucks-style coffee shop. Enjoy a double cappuccino and the expansive views of bustling Ezeiza on the McCafe’s large outdoor seating area.

In the ever-evolving Palermo Viejo, glamorous restaurants come and go within a week, but this spacious destination, housed in a converted manor, has stood the test of time (and economic crisis).

Of all the steak houses in this carnivorous city, La Brigada may have the most loyal following: members of the national soccer team are regulars. Have the colita de lomo, a sirloin tail so buttery you can cut it with a spoon.

A classic, consistent, tried and true parrilla that ranks among the city’s best.

Tucked behind the Four Seasons hotel is La Mansion, an 88-year-old Belle Époque mansion built by Felix Alzaga Unzué as a wedding gift for his wife. Four Seasons dropped $1 million on a restoration of the regal building’s frescoes, marble, and 24-karat-gold-trimmed wood paneling.

Of the dozens of fine steak houses that line the picturesque docks of Puerto Madero, Las Lilas is arguably the best (and certainly the most famous: Jenna Bush reportedly dined here in 2007).

Since the restaurant’s revamp in 2009, politicos have returned for the modern takes on classic Porteño fare—mushroom-stuffed squid and tender suckling pig roasted in a clay oven—in the classic oak-paneled dining room.

Located in the Recoleta neighborhood, Cumaná serves both Argentine dishes and non-traditional fare like wood-fired pizzas. Lanterns and shelves of ornamental bottles decorate the bright, orange walls.

This tall, airy storefront in Palermo Viejo is presided over by the colorful Cecilia Hermann, who could have stepped out of a magical-realist novel. Guardian of Argentina’s culinary traditions—with a penchant for angel figurines—she presents a nearly anthropological display of sweets.

Owner Luis Acuna founded El Pobre Luis back in 1986, and the unassuming Núñez parrilla has become one of the city’s most legendary. Poor Lou, as hes called, is credited with first bringing the style of asado (grilled meat) from his native Uruguay to Buenos Aires.

Don’t expect the same tasty pies from this porteño pizzeria’s Ezeiza location. The Italian menu here is basic, with classic sandwiches (ham and cheese; tomato, basil, and mozzarella, etc.) and overpriced salads. It is also a full coffee shop, with espresso, lattes, and pastries.

The 1998 shuttering of this 124-year-old café caused such an uproar that within six weeks the city legislature gave it historic protection to save it; a 2001 restoration of the over-the-top elegance of the interior, with its three 19th-century stained-glass windows and marble bar, returned the Fr