Buenos Aires

Restaurants in Buenos Aires

Olsen transports diners from Palermo Viejo to Scandinavia with its seafood-heavy menu and impressive selection of more than 60 vodkas. Dishes like blini, smoked herring, and red tuna are a large part of the restaurant’s allure, but so is the 60’s-inspired dining room, set in a former warehouse.

Lost in a time warp amid Palermo’s trendy spots, this classic has retained its original grocery. Eat in the back room with red-checked tablecloths where a mix of old-timers and barrio hipsters order the signature fabada (Spanish bean-and-sausage casserole).

Compare Malbecs from Argentina’s different regions around this tall
marble tasting bar. Here, superman sommelier Marcelo Rebolé oversees a
7,000-bottle cellar with some five dozen by-the-glass offerings
complemented by house-aged cheeses.

The spare, sleek building, designed by three young Argentine architects, holds this airy, glass-walled café—open at night Thursdays through Saturdays—that’s perfect for a post-visit caipirinha or delicious dessert.  In warm weather, sit outside under a huge jacaranda tree and order the “Argentino

One of the joys of dining in Buenos Aires is that virtually any restaurant with a grill can crank out the best beef you’ve ever tasted. This no-frills parrilla is a perfect example of scrumptious simplicity.

An unmarked doorway in Villa Crespo conceals Almacén Secreto, the private kingdom of chef Abigail Machicado, who prepares dishes from Argentina's south (venison raviolones), center (oven-baked Paraná River fish), and north (charquisillo, a stew made with cured meat).

This bustling lunchtime favorite among Porteños, who have been crowding the two level space since it first opened in another location in the 1940s.

With its huge picture windows, long red banquettes, and curved wood walls, the Standard takes the style of an Edward Hopper 1950s diner (albeit with a less lonely vibe) and updates it with a minimalist, modern look.

Bringing the gaucho tradition to La Boca, famed pampa chef Francis Mallman set up his grill at this renovated Italianate town house not far from the brightly painted houses and tango dances on Caminito.

Since its opening in 1866, the storied French Club has drawn generations of politicians and writers. While the city’s intelligentsia still congregates at the lobby bar, the upper floor was recently turned into a 28-room hotel filled with antiques and period furniture.

This 1954 stalwart on a hard-to-find street in La Boca serves up nostalgia alongside plump steaks, tortillas de papa, and shared tureens of homey soup. Yes, that is a photo of Bono and Francis Ford Coppola on the wall.

Here’s a nook once loved by Jorge Luis Borges. Over there, a table favored by tango singer Carlos Gardel. Here, your café con crema comes surrounded by history. Order the tostado especial Tortoni, the world’s biggest yet lightest grilled cheese, ham, and tomato sandwich.

Hands down the best option for a sit-down dinner, La Pausa serves excellent Argentine cuisine like grilled bife de chorizo (sirloin strip) or four-cheese gnocchi in a spacious, low-lit dining room.