Buenos Aires

Hotels in Buenos Aires

Comfort and luxury are absolute priorities at Buenos Aires hotels. The city’s old world elegance and modern spirit come together in top-rated accommodations across town. Some of the best hotels in Buenos Aires offer fine dining, spa services and high-tech amenities to make your stay as flawless as possible. At Faena Hotel, guests can stay in sprawling suites accented with romantic décor, have afternoon tea at the elegantly-outfitted Library Lounge or enjoy an alfresco dinner at El Mercado restaurant, with a personal experience manager overseeing their entire stay.

In the heart of the beautiful Recoleta neighborhood, Alvear Palace Hotel features a spa and fitness area, a business center, two upscale restaurants and a Cigar Bar, where even non-smokers can treat themselves to a relaxing afternoon with high-quality chocolates and liqueurs. Also in Recoleta, Palacio Duhau-Park Hyatt is a relaxing oasis in the city, with lush gardens and spacious, bright rooms. The hotel even houses an art gallery named Paseo de las Artes, showcasing sculptures and paintings by Argentinian and Latin American artists.

The charming Orly is housed in a renovated, three-level French provincial mansion, originally constructed in the 1940s as a family home close to Avenida Providencia.

You can see yachts pass on the river through the glass atrium lobby, standing seven stories high and covered with a 7,535 square feet glass roof, at this Puerto Madero hotel.

Since its December 2005 opening in Palermo Hollywood, the rock star–funded (U2 producer Flood and Crowded House bassist Nick Seymour) hotel quickly became the go-to lodgings for Diesel jeans–clad cool kids.

The first true urban boutique hotel in Recoleta when it opened in 1999, Design Suites now has locations in Calafate, Salta, and Bariloche.

The hotel draws on the Belle Époque theme of tango's heyday, with Art Nouveau furniture and antique Victrolas. At the gift shop, buy a pair of Madreselva's sexy tango shoes, then join the hotel's free nightly dance class.

This Buenos Aires–based outfit has 20 villas and penthouses in Uruguay, Brazil, Argentina, Guatemala, and the Galápagos. Prior to guests’ arrival, properties are stocked with food, champagne, and fresh flowers.

Located in Puerto Madero, a newly developed neighborhood marked by glass-front buildings that line the Río de la Plata riverfront, this hotel is styled with an uncluttered lobby that is dotted with couches, each set on a carpeted island, and a ceiling-high screen backlit by soft violet light at n

The easy pace at El Rocío, a guesthouse and working ranch, makes it seem worlds away from the cosmopolitan and frenetic city, even though it is just 60 miles outside of Buenos Aires.

After tiring of their marketing jobs at Coca-Cola, Estela Títere and Silvina Tarrio bought this stately 1820s mansion—located in the historic neighborhood adjacent to San Telmo—from the descendants of the Italian Podestá family, who built and still lived in it.

Tucked among the early-20th-century town houses in the fashionable Palermo neighborhood, the restored hotel has an original stained-glass ceiling in the foyer and antique furnishings in the eight bedrooms.

Built in the late 18th century, this former convent was the first boutique hotel in Argentina. Located in the Palermo Soho neighborhood, the hotel has 15 rooms with high ceilings, wood floors set against white linen, and lots of natural light.

With its oversize saffron-colored lobby chairs, all-white rooms, square white buffet trays, and penchant for clean, futuristic lines, the 28-room cE feels like an iPod’s giant offspring.

Prodigal son Hernán Gipponi (who ran the restaurant at the Guggenheim Bilbao, in Spain) returns to his native Buenos Aires as head chef at the food-centric, 27-room hotel. Gipponi's menu is the highlight, but don't miss the killer wine cellar or the seventh-floor pool.

This Park Hyatt feels like two hotels in one. The original 23-room mansion, built in 1934 by French architect Leon Dourge, defines Belle Époque elegance with elaborate ironwork, glass chandeliers, and Persian rugs.