Buenos Aires

Hotels in Buenos Aires

Comfort and luxury are absolute priorities at Buenos Aires hotels. The city’s old world elegance and modern spirit come together in top-rated accommodations across town. Some of the best hotels in Buenos Aires offer fine dining, spa services and high-tech amenities to make your stay as flawless as possible. At Faena Hotel, guests can stay in sprawling suites accented with romantic décor, have afternoon tea at the elegantly-outfitted Library Lounge or enjoy an alfresco dinner at El Mercado restaurant, with a personal experience manager overseeing their entire stay.

In the heart of the beautiful Recoleta neighborhood, Alvear Palace Hotel features a spa and fitness area, a business center, two upscale restaurants and a Cigar Bar, where even non-smokers can treat themselves to a relaxing afternoon with high-quality chocolates and liqueurs. Also in Recoleta, Palacio Duhau-Park Hyatt is a relaxing oasis in the city, with lush gardens and spacious, bright rooms. The hotel even houses an art gallery named Paseo de las Artes, showcasing sculptures and paintings by Argentinian and Latin American artists.

On a Sunday afternoon, you’ll have a hard time finding a district more peaceful than Las Cañitas, in the north end of the city near the polo grounds. Saturday night, it’s a different story, as pedigreed Porteños descend on its restaurants and bars en masse.

A 2009 renovation of Buenos Aires’ Algodon Mansion, in the city’s Recoleta neighborhood, upped the ante at the six-story Belle Époque gem. The New York-based owners of Algodon (also the forces behind the Mendoza-based Algodon Wine Estates) spared no expense.

Built in the late 18th century, this former convent was the first boutique hotel in Argentina. Located in the Palermo Soho neighborhood, the hotel has 15 rooms with high ceilings, wood floors set against white linen, and lots of natural light.

175 rooms and a marble-clad lobby, on a quiet downtown side street. 

Located in a Neoclassical building near the Borges Cultural Center, Esplendor has the vibe of a modern- art museum—note the floating staircase, crisp white walls, and massive portraits of Argentine icons (Che Guevara, Eva Perón) made of such unorthodox materials as cookies, bullets, and thread.

Prodigal son Hernán Gipponi (who ran the restaurant at the Guggenheim Bilbao, in Spain) returns to his native Buenos Aires as head chef at the food-centric, 27-room hotel. Gipponi's menu is the highlight, but don't miss the killer wine cellar or the seventh-floor pool.

With its oversize saffron-colored lobby chairs, all-white rooms, square white buffet trays, and penchant for clean, futuristic lines, the 28-room cE feels like an iPod’s giant offspring.

The Hotel: Occupying a stately, renovated, century-old townhouse, the Art Hotel lives up to its name: the grand, high-ceilinged ground floor (which has a cozy library lounge and breakfast area) does double duty as a gallery, and each of the 36 clean-lined, wood-floored rooms is d

The charming Orly is housed in a renovated, three-level French provincial mansion, originally constructed in the 1940s as a family home close to Avenida Providencia.

This Park Hyatt feels like two hotels in one. The original 23-room mansion, built in 1934 by French architect Leon Dourge, defines Belle Époque elegance with elaborate ironwork, glass chandeliers, and Persian rugs.

Ever since it opened in 2003, this tiny hotel in the historic, hostel-heavy San Telmo neighborhood has been crazily popular. Each of the five rooms in the restored Art Nouveau townhouse is uniquely decorated, from the conversation pit and groovy white modernism of No.

You can see yachts pass on the river through the glass atrium lobby, standing seven stories high and covered with a 7,535 square feet glass roof, at this Puerto Madero hotel.

The self-described first boutique hotel in Buenos Aires, four-year-old Bo Bo—named in honor of American writer David Brooks’s coinage for “bourgeois bohemians”—launched the city’s design hotel boom and remains the purest expression of the form.

This Buenos Aires landmark—situated smack dab in Recoleta, the city's most exclusive shopping barrio—occupies a modern 12-story tower and a handsome Belle Époque mansion, connected by immaculately landscaped gardens.

Since its December 2005 opening in Palermo Hollywood, the rock star–funded (U2 producer Flood and Crowded House bassist Nick Seymour) hotel quickly became the go-to lodgings for Diesel jeans–clad cool kids.