Buenos Aires

Things to do in Buenos Aires

The lovely streets of Buenos Aires are ideal for walking and absorbing the city’s spirit. Start your sightseeing journey at Casa Rosada, the presidential palace, where you can take a guided tour. Nearby, the Metropolitan Cathedral and the Santo Domingo Church and Convent are stunning examples of the city’s grandeur. If you’re an opera aficionado, make sure to check the schedule at the Colón Theater before your visit–you might catch a memorable performance. Tango shows are on top of most visitors’ lists of things to do in Buenos Aires. Classic clubs like Café Tortoni and Tango Porteño will give you an excellent taste of this sexy dance.

Continue the search for buzzing nightlife at Palermo Soho, a chic neighborhood lined with vintage boutiques, open-air markets and lively bars and restaurants. With its ornate mausoleums, the Recoleta Cemetery is another must-do. Walk around impressive vaults built in Art Deco and Baroque styles, and pay a visit to former first lady Eva Perón or Liliana Crociati de Szaszak, a young Austrian woman whose tomb was designed by her mother in Neo-Gothic style. Other enjoyable activities in Buenos Aires include walking around Caminito, an alley lined with brightly-colored houses in La Boca, or the bohemian cobblestone streets of San Telmo, where you’ll be surrounded by artists and street performers.

Some 25 years ago, antiquarian Ricardo Paz visited the dry forest of northern Argentina and found villages of artisans turning out colorful textiles and organic wood and leather furniture—a tradition that died down when the region was deforested to make way for farms.

A customer purportedly bought shoes here, wore them when she got home to Manhattan, and pretty soon the costume department for the Sex and the City movie—the Holy Grail in media footwear endorsement—reportedly came calling. A single stiletto revolves on a

Get all your bath and body needs—or just relax into the spa-like vibe—at this little stand, which carries essential oils, aromatherapeutic salves like invigorating eucalyptus body scrub, and “masculine beauty” products just for men.

Depending on the visitor, either a lovably bohemian neighborhood of art galleries and ancient homes or a grungy neighborhood of overpriced tchotchkes. San Telmo hosts the famous Plaza Dorrego antique and art fair every Sunday. Go early (it opens at 10 a.m.).

Old-world masters like Rubens and Picasso are well represented, but the best part of the museum is the Argentinean art—the most extensive collection anywhere.

Recharge with a frothy concoction (grapefruit-lemongrass-spirulina, perhaps) at this new juice bar, adored by the neighborhood’s skinny-jeans brigade for its cozy patio and yogurt muffins loaded with blueberries from the owners’ farm.

For years, Argentine leather goods were (in)famous for combining good materials with bad design, something that people like Humawaca cofounder Ingrid Gudman, a former architect, are changing. Gudman’s locally made designs tend toward the surprising and multipart.

Hybrid Spanish and Tango courses spice up language learning with five weekly lessons at one of the city’s best dance schools.

It’s not surprising that Eva Perón is interred in the very heart of this neighborhood. Evita will always be remembered for, among other things, her elegant wardrobe.

One of the dullest aspects of learning a new language is that it’s often presented as dry grammar in a classroom, shorn of all relationship to reality. Paula Capodistria Wangberg’s Español Andando—Walking Spanish—solves this problem by taking it to the streets.

Locals shuddered and shouted when rumors circulated in 1999 that this historic theater might be torn down.

This Barnes & Noble–style bookstore sells Spanish-language books, music CDs, children’s games, and a wide selection of DVDs.

center of Buenos Aires high society, beautiful Recoleta may boast more polished brass than Fifth Avenue. The neighborhood is full of upscale clothing and furniture—and prices.

Opened in 2001 as a sort of personal art museum of Argentine über–real estate developer Eduardo Costantini, MALBA—the Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires—now plays a central role in Buenos Aires’s artistic and cultural life.

Amid San Telmo's antiques galleries, ArtePampa sells pre-Columbian-style dolls, llama-motif mirrors, and lampshades of lacquered, textured paper, all handcrafted in the central province of La Pampa.