Buenos Aires

Things to do in Buenos Aires

The lovely streets of Buenos Aires are ideal for walking and absorbing the city’s spirit. Start your sightseeing journey at Casa Rosada, the presidential palace, where you can take a guided tour. Nearby, the Metropolitan Cathedral and the Santo Domingo Church and Convent are stunning examples of the city’s grandeur. If you’re an opera aficionado, make sure to check the schedule at the Colón Theater before your visit–you might catch a memorable performance. Tango shows are on top of most visitors’ lists of things to do in Buenos Aires. Classic clubs like Café Tortoni and Tango Porteño will give you an excellent taste of this sexy dance.

Continue the search for buzzing nightlife at Palermo Soho, a chic neighborhood lined with vintage boutiques, open-air markets and lively bars and restaurants. With its ornate mausoleums, the Recoleta Cemetery is another must-do. Walk around impressive vaults built in Art Deco and Baroque styles, and pay a visit to former first lady Eva Perón or Liliana Crociati de Szaszak, a young Austrian woman whose tomb was designed by her mother in Neo-Gothic style. Other enjoyable activities in Buenos Aires include walking around Caminito, an alley lined with brightly-colored houses in La Boca, or the bohemian cobblestone streets of San Telmo, where you’ll be surrounded by artists and street performers.

With more than 4,700 ornate stone crypts laid out along a streetlike grid, this graveyard is an architectural masterpiece, and an eerie miniature city for the wealthy dead (and more than a few cats).

Right off Plaza Dorrego is Gil Antigüedades, an unexpected dreamworld of vintage clothing.

The most reliable of the airport remis (taxi) services, this 82-year-old company shuttles passengers between Buenos Aires and the airport in late-model, air-conditioned cars ($38 per car) or minivans ($45) that carry up to four passengers.

Home to the bohemian enclave of Palermo Soho, this was the first of the city’s gentrified districts, and is still an art and design hub.

This influential gallery exhibits work from the country's biggest names, such as the avant-garde Mondongo collective, known for rendering images in sliced cold cuts.

This book dealer offers first editions and historical paraphernalia. Our favorites: Bruce Chatwin’s In Patagonia and pictures of Jorge Luis Borges at his family’s kitchen table.

Despite—or maybe because of—its chandeliers and dramatic glass ceiling, some visitors will find Patio Bullrich, considered the town’s most prestigious mall, just a tad too sterile; others will be amused to discover a McDonald’s and a Christian Lacroix under the same roof.

Part of the city’s speakeasy boom, the Thelonious Club is an industrial-looking upstairs jazz bar with a small corner stage where well-known local and international jazz musicians play under a medusa-like chandelier.

Historic in architectural form, this museum and event space is housed in a 178-year-old mansion–turned–boarding house that once sat atop the city’s earliest sewer system.

Of the many shops specializing in tango clothing and shoes—custom-made or not—Flabella Tango, where around $60 will buy a pair of glittery bright- blue heels, has an excellent reputation.

If you need to change money upon arrival, head to this national bank, which offers the best exchange rates in the airport (avoid the Global Exchange window outside Customs).

So-named because of the number of TV studios within its boundaries, the tree-filled and cobblestoned Hollywood is ground zero for the city’s restaurant scene renaissance.

Stop by for a glass of Malbec and some tapas at this industrial, concrete-walled wine bar, softened by thousands of candles placed all around.

This recentlry resotred structure became the city's first skyscraper when it opened in 1923. A tour of the Art Nouveau-inspired building offers some of the best views of the skyline.