Buenos Aires

Things to do in Buenos Aires

The lovely streets of Buenos Aires are ideal for walking and absorbing the city’s spirit. Start your sightseeing journey at Casa Rosada, the presidential palace, where you can take a guided tour. Nearby, the Metropolitan Cathedral and the Santo Domingo Church and Convent are stunning examples of the city’s grandeur. If you’re an opera aficionado, make sure to check the schedule at the Colón Theater before your visit–you might catch a memorable performance. Tango shows are on top of most visitors’ lists of things to do in Buenos Aires. Classic clubs like Café Tortoni and Tango Porteño will give you an excellent taste of this sexy dance.

Continue the search for buzzing nightlife at Palermo Soho, a chic neighborhood lined with vintage boutiques, open-air markets and lively bars and restaurants. With its ornate mausoleums, the Recoleta Cemetery is another must-do. Walk around impressive vaults built in Art Deco and Baroque styles, and pay a visit to former first lady Eva Perón or Liliana Crociati de Szaszak, a young Austrian woman whose tomb was designed by her mother in Neo-Gothic style. Other enjoyable activities in Buenos Aires include walking around Caminito, an alley lined with brightly-colored houses in La Boca, or the bohemian cobblestone streets of San Telmo, where you’ll be surrounded by artists and street performers.

This smart stop for traditional Argentine items sells woven gaucho-style ponchos, silver jewelry, supple leather belts and wallets, and the ultimate Buenos Aires souvenir: maté sets, replete with the mate (gourd), yerba (loose tea), and bombilla (metal straw).

Built in 1914 (and temporarily closed until December 2008), this beautiful park—with its Rosedal rose garden and a delicate white wooden bridge crossing a figure-eight lake—serves as ground zero for sun-loving Argentines on weekend strolls.

Buenos Aires Design features more than 60 different shops. Situated on a hill next to the famous Recoleta Cemetery, the center showcases the best of contemporary B.A. home design.

Barrenechea is known for helping to cultivate travel to Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay.

Modest Almagro, reportedly the birthplace of the tango, is known for its dance halls, which cater to a mix of tourists and locals. Here you’ll also find the house museum of Carlos Gardel, tango’s most famous singer.

The streets between Plazoleta Cortázar and Plaza Palermo Viejo are packed with stylish boutiques. Stop by Papelera Palermo for fine handmade paper goods.

On the platform in the subway station between Buenos Aires’s court buildings and the famous Teatro Colón, the Cartala brothers’ modest kiosk sells an inexpensive and functional reminder of the city: the traditional white oval metal address signs that adorn the local buildings.

On Sundays it feels like the entire population of Buenos Aires flocks to the San Telmo neighborhood, home to a network of antiques centers that seems to stretch for miles.

The selection of vinos at this well-curated wine store includes everything from upmarket labels like Catena Zapata (try the 2004 Cabernet Sauvignon) to more everyday classics, such as Luigi Bosca (a full range, from Malbecs to Chardonnays).

The geographical center of Buenos Aires during its great expansion during the late 19th century and now a middle-class residential district. A spate of hip new bars, restaurants, and boutiques was introduced to its northern edge as Palermo Viejo began to overflow its borders.

The satisfying aroma of leather greets you as you enter Arandú, which is dedicated to handicrafts. Stock up on woven bracelets, suede hunting bags, needlepoint belts, and alpaca-silver picture frames. Burnished riding boots are remarkably underpriced at around $350.

Located on the Parque Centenario, this authentic, neighborhood milonga that is very much not oriented towards tourists features one large tango patio on a black and white checkered tile floor.

The streets between Plazoleta Cortázar and Plaza Palermo Viejo are packed with stylish boutiques. Stop by Calma Chica for cowhide pillows.

A family of German immigrants opened this marroquinería (leather-store) across from Plaza San Martin in 1943. The shelves are stocked with handcrafted handbags, apparel, and accessories for women and men.

This celadon and white chocolatería, creates extraordinary confections in the form of automobiles, teddies, hats, and what is practically a national symbol—the tango shoe, rendered in white Belgian chocolate.