Buenos Aires

Things to do in Buenos Aires

The lovely streets of Buenos Aires are ideal for walking and absorbing the city’s spirit. Start your sightseeing journey at Casa Rosada, the presidential palace, where you can take a guided tour. Nearby, the Metropolitan Cathedral and the Santo Domingo Church and Convent are stunning examples of the city’s grandeur. If you’re an opera aficionado, make sure to check the schedule at the Colón Theater before your visit–you might catch a memorable performance. Tango shows are on top of most visitors’ lists of things to do in Buenos Aires. Classic clubs like Café Tortoni and Tango Porteño will give you an excellent taste of this sexy dance.

Continue the search for buzzing nightlife at Palermo Soho, a chic neighborhood lined with vintage boutiques, open-air markets and lively bars and restaurants. With its ornate mausoleums, the Recoleta Cemetery is another must-do. Walk around impressive vaults built in Art Deco and Baroque styles, and pay a visit to former first lady Eva Perón or Liliana Crociati de Szaszak, a young Austrian woman whose tomb was designed by her mother in Neo-Gothic style. Other enjoyable activities in Buenos Aires include walking around Caminito, an alley lined with brightly-colored houses in La Boca, or the bohemian cobblestone streets of San Telmo, where you’ll be surrounded by artists and street performers.

Sign up during the day for lessons at this old-world tango salon—featured in the movie Evita—then come back at night to show off your new moves during a milonga (tango party).

After 10 years on Palermo Viejo’s Plaza Julio Cortázar—a small plaza that’s the epicenter of Buenos Aires nightlife—this artsy bar has perfected the formula for keeping drinkers happy: simple wooden tables, ample exposed brick, affordable drinks, and attentive but informal service.

Walk down a short corridor and ring the bell to enter Nadine Zlotogora, where a rich-hippie aesthetic rules. The frothy confections—tiered black dotted-Swiss dresses and speckled cotton knit blazers—avoid saccharine territory by being paired with the shop’s line of high-top sneakers.

On Sundays it seems like the entire population of Buenos Aires flocks to San Telmo, a newly chic boho district. Start at Plaza Dorego then fan out to the various antiques centers, which seem to stretch for miles.

Pretty without being pretentious, the Buenos Aires horse-racing track bears witness to the elegance that once surrounded the sport.

The shoes here are intended for Buenos Aires' signature "sexy girl" crowd: on a tufted-velvet pouf in the center of a fuchsia jewel box, Porteñas slip into high sandals embellished with jewels and strips of metallic snakeskin that cost a mere $175.

No airport salon can compete with the haircut miracles that in-town stylists perform.

In less-visited Caballito, locals have bargained with butchers and greengrocers for more than 100 years under these iron arcades.

Named for the slaughterhouses that provided Buenos Aires with its beloved carne, Mataderos is a far-flung industrial neighborhood known for its traditional Gaucho street fair, which happens every Sunday from April to December.

No trip to the city that gave birth to the sultry tango would be complete without taking in a live show. This tiny club, with its black-and-white dance floor, feels like a flashback to another era.

As Recoleta mansions were carved into progressively smaller apartments after World War II, the city found itself awash in Art Deco furniture sold by rich Porteños who’d seen their fortunes slide.

MU

The little orange house where MU has set up shop was once a private home. Now the bathroom provides space for a clerk and a computer; doors have become worktables. The merchandise, selected by three owners and tapping the talents of more than 100 artisans.

Better known as Ezeiza International Airport, or simply Ezeiza, Argentina’s principal international airport sits 26 miles to the southwest of the center of Buenos Aires.

This weekly street fair is where Porteños go to discover their country’s rural roots without leaving the city.

Only four people are allowed in at one time where vintage license plates share space with spindly drinking glasses.