Brussels

Brussels Travel Guide

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In Brussels’s main square, 10 master Belgian chocolate makers are showcased at this boutique, where they host daily workshops to teach the secret ingredients of their country’s rich dark and white cocoa.

This year-old cooking school–cum–bookshop also sells esoteric ingredients like Orleans vinegar.

Though they aim to emulate Axel Vervoordt, this design store is a more affordable and polite version of eclectic Belgian style.

These dealers in African art and relics as well as the adjacent Congo Basin Art History Research Center can be found on a charming lane off the Place du Grand Sablon.

Established in 1839, this antiques store is one of the few still holding on to its spot on the Place du Grand Sablon. Its salons are filled with 18th-century furniture and objets - and sometimes with audiences for Baroque concerts - but the courtyard is what sets Costermans apart.

Do yourself a favor and stop by the boutique chocolatier, Pierre Marcolini, in Place du Grand Sablon.

The multitalented Muriel Bardinet (dealer, interior designer, painter, photographer) puts the chic back into shabby.

Haute Antiques houses 40 dealers whose wares span the full range of styles and periods, from a fanciful iron birdcage and a mod trapezoidal fireplace, to a flat-bottomed skiff suspended from the ceiling in the basement.

What to Expect: Brussels' Christmas market has been around only since 2002, but it pulls off its Plaisirs d'Hiver/Winter Pret ("Pleasures of Winter") festival with elegant style.

Treat yourself to a package of speculoos (traditional Belgian spice cookies) to snack on as you descend back toward the Grand Place.

American decorators haunt this place for Michel Lambrecht's clever furnishings.

An ormolu-mounted fruit-wood desk and a bench of thick rubber molded to resemble giant blocks of chocolate front a huge painting of African dancers.