Brooklyn

Brooklyn Travel Guide

One of the neighborhood’s most popular draws, Brooklyn Brewery was one of the first craft brewers around when it opened in 1988. Today, it produces 26 styles throughout the year, and regularly hosts tours throughout the week.

It was only a matter of time before Williamsburg got its own winery. This one, with 18 locally made, award-winning wines, offers flights, curated cheese and charcuterie plates to accompany tastings, and communal seating to encourage sharing notes.

When Williamsburg was still bereft of a cinema, Nitehawk came in with a decidedly Brooklyn approach. It installed a bar and lounge on the main floor, for before- or after-show lingering. Upstairs, by the screening rooms, another bar serves guests while they wait to be seated.

This tiny bakery is locals’ go-to spot to for sweet and savory baked goods on the weekends. A buzzing group of bakers in blue work jumpsuits hum along to the likes of Fleetwood Mac while churning out flaky almond croissants and crusty baguettes, that can sell out by 10:30 a.m.

Located discreetly behind red metal gates in what at first glance appears to be a furniture shop, this beer bar has one of the neighborhood’s most extensive lists of craft beer on tap, in bottles and in a few casks that rotate out regularly.

Claiming the longest happy hour in Brooklyn (12–7 p.m.), this former 1930’s ice cream parlor just north of Prospect Park fills its cherry-red bar and leather stools with beer lovers, who come for the wide draught selection of craft beers like Sixpoint, Pinnacle, and Coney Island Lager.

Owner Linda Downey’s interior-design and clothing boutique is tactile heaven: Mongolian-lamb rugs, silk coverlets, hand-loomed striped blankets, and mohair throws.

In a borough littered with beautiful old buildings, these architectural-salvage specialists sell an impressive range of hard-to-find fixtures and hardware.

Husband-and-wife team Eva and Gentry Dayton added some motorcycle chic to this minimalist, gallery-like boutique.

Opened by Patrick Watson and Michele Pravda as a companion to their renowned Skinky Bklyn cheese shop down the road, this wine shop in Carroll Gardens maintains the same youthful ambiance with tangerine tin wall panels, taped-up flyers, and a stock of relatively cheap bottles (including a $12-or-

Opened in July 2011 on Bedford Avenue right between the L train stop and McCarren Park, the newest location of this Brooklyn based company features their full collection of retro-inspired women’s and men’s clothing, jewelry, and other accessories, most of which is hand-made up the block in owner-

A bright blue exterior with large windows displays what this gourmet market is most recognized for: a traditional butchery specializing in locally raised, grass-fed beef.

Like a closet out of The Arabian Nights, this boutique is stocked with hand-loomed, Indian-inspired textiles and antique jewelry.

This summer, the East River takes center stage with a spectacular installation by Icelandic-Danish artist Olafur Eliasson: The New York City Waterfalls, a series of four 90- to 120-foot-tall curtains of water that will punctuate the river and harbor at di