Brooklyn

Brooklyn Travel Guide

It’s never hard to find things to do in Brooklyn, it’s just difficult to figure out exactly what you want to do! Foodies will fall head-over-heels for Brooklyn’s culinary scene and should pay a visit to the Brooklyn Flea/Smorgasburg, held in Williamsburg every Saturday and in Fort Greene every Sunday during the late spring and summer, as well as its extension, Berg’n. The massive Crown Heights beer hall features a great draft list and food booths run by the Brooklyn Flea’s biggest stars like Mighty Quinn’s Barbecue and Ramen Burger.

As for sights and sounds, be sure to visit the massive Brooklyn Bridge Park, which not only offers wonderful views of the Manhattan skyline, but features great amenities of its own including a roller rink, a small beach and plenty of courts for the sportsmen and women among us. Meanwhile, artsy types will want to visit the neighborhood of Bushwick, which is home to dozens of local galleries like BogART, which hosts multiple galleries in a former factory, as well as the neighborhood around the Jefferson Street stop on the L subway line where gorgeous graffiti murals cover almost every wall.

And finally, those looking for things to do in Brooklyn won’t want to miss out on the great Prospect Park-adjacent neighborhoods of Park Slope, Gowanus, South Slope, Prospect Heights and Windsor Terrace. These kid-friendly neighborhoods feature all sorts of quirky shops and shopping experiences set on streets picturesque and charming enough to make any visitor want to pack up and move to NYC. Spend an afternoon strolling around before settling down at legendary local eateries like Franny’s and al di la. And if you have the energy at the end of what will surely be an exciting trip, spend a day in Vinegar Hill, a quiet waterfront neighborhood with cobblestone streets, and one of Brooklyn’s best-kept secrets. All at once the neighborhood is a taste of what Brooklyn used to be and what it is now and remains the perfect end to what will hopefully be a perfect visit.

This tiny bakery is locals’ go-to spot to for sweet and savory baked goods on the weekends. A buzzing group of bakers in blue work jumpsuits hum along to the likes of Fleetwood Mac while churning out flaky almond croissants and crusty baguettes, that can sell out by 10:30 a.m.

Located discreetly behind red metal gates in what at first glance appears to be a furniture shop, this beer bar has one of the neighborhood’s most extensive lists of craft beer on tap, in bottles and in a few casks that rotate out regularly.

A great vintage store for blazers

This venue is closed.

13 vendors sell Honduran tacos, Mexican huaraches, Ecuadoran ceviche, and other delicious treats to spectators and players alike (a semi-pro league holds matches here every weekend).

 

open all day Sat. and Sun., mid-April to mid-October

Funniest club in the borough?Definitely. This glitzy, schmaltzy, Russian-Georgian supper club hosts a nightly bacchanal replete with dinner, disco balls, drinking (a lot of drinking), and supremely cheesy live music that’s hardly changed since the place opened in 1981.

The housewares here range from kitschy items like Piet Houtenbos's infamous grenade lamp to diminutive, high-concept products from other esteemed designers.

At this fairy tale of a store, you'll find mobiles hand-stitched from Liberty of London fabrics, bamboo model airplanes made in Vietnam, German Waldorf dolls, and embroidered Mexican bibs.

A retro dessert parlor with cookies named after the owner’s relatives, and whoopee pies made of cream cheese and pumpkin cake.

In Prospect Heights, this cash-only neighborhood bar attracts guests with its cushioned deep couches, a long wooden communal table, and a small outdoor patio in the rear decorated in white Christmas lights.

The nation's first museum just for kids sports a new canary-yellow, Rafael Viñoly-designed upper level incorporating solar panels, and has display cases made of compressed sunflower seeds. See the permanent exhibit on Brooklyn's natural habitats (yes, New

This Coney Island fruit shop carries the gamut of fruit-based creations, from platters and baskets to chocolate-dipped fruits. Daniel Spitz started the shop in 1957, and his son Mitchell now runs the place (although Daniel continues to keep a close eye on operations).