Brooklyn Travel Guide

Located discreetly behind red metal gates in what at first glance appears to be a furniture shop, this beer bar has one of the neighborhood’s most extensive lists of craft beer on tap, in bottles and in a few casks that rotate out regularly.

This tiny bakery is locals’ go-to spot to for sweet and savory baked goods on the weekends. A buzzing group of bakers in blue work jumpsuits hum along to the likes of Fleetwood Mac while churning out flaky almond croissants and crusty baguettes, that can sell out by 10:30 a.m.

This bowling alley on the border of Williamsburg and Greenpoint opened less than a decade ago, but it manages to transport bowlers to the Midwest in the 1970’s, with its nostalgic décor and old-school scoring machines.

This venue is closed.

Funniest club in the borough?Definitely. This glitzy, schmaltzy, Russian-Georgian supper club hosts a nightly bacchanal replete with dinner, disco balls, drinking (a lot of drinking), and supremely cheesy live music that’s hardly changed since the place opened in 1981.

The housewares here range from kitschy items like Piet Houtenbos's infamous grenade lamp to diminutive, high-concept products from other esteemed designers.

However playful its tangerine walls and funky signs, this specialty cheese and meat shop in Carroll Gardens is serious about its search for unique culinary expression, whether it be its ham bar, temperature- and humidity-controlled aging “cave,” or monthly cheese seminars.

Oak floors, lacquered brick walls, and a sound track of gypsy music set the scene for Santa Maria Novella toiletries (originally made by Italian monks) and Borsalino fedoras mixed with Rogan knits, Filson bags, and Rachel Comey sandals.

...hop on the L subway line to Williamsburg, Brooklyn, for a free tour of the Brooklyn Brewery and its vats of microbrews.

In Prospect Heights, this cash-only neighborhood bar attracts guests with its cushioned deep couches, a long wooden communal table, and a small outdoor patio in the rear decorated in white Christmas lights.

The Brooklyn Historical Society has informative neighborhood guides.

This Coney Island fruit shop carries the gamut of fruit-based creations, from platters and baskets to chocolate-dipped fruits. Daniel Spitz started the shop in 1957, and his son Mitchell now runs the place (although Daniel continues to keep a close eye on operations).

An airy showcase for top fashion names such as Dries van Noten and Rick Owens. The shoe selection alone (Henry Beguelin, Ann Demeulemeester) inspires many a pilgrimage from Manhattan.