Brooklyn

Brooklyn Travel Guide

One of the neighborhood’s most popular draws, Brooklyn Brewery was one of the first craft brewers around when it opened in 1988. Today, it produces 26 styles throughout the year, and regularly hosts tours throughout the week.

It was only a matter of time before Williamsburg got its own winery. This one, with 18 locally made, award-winning wines, offers flights, curated cheese and charcuterie plates to accompany tastings, and communal seating to encourage sharing notes.

When Williamsburg was still bereft of a cinema, Nitehawk came in with a decidedly Brooklyn approach. It installed a bar and lounge on the main floor, for before- or after-show lingering. Upstairs, by the screening rooms, another bar serves guests while they wait to be seated.

This tiny bakery is locals’ go-to spot to for sweet and savory baked goods on the weekends. A buzzing group of bakers in blue work jumpsuits hum along to the likes of Fleetwood Mac while churning out flaky almond croissants and crusty baguettes, that can sell out by 10:30 a.m.

Located discreetly behind red metal gates in what at first glance appears to be a furniture shop, this beer bar has one of the neighborhood’s most extensive lists of craft beer on tap, in bottles and in a few casks that rotate out regularly.

A retro dessert parlor with cookies named after the owner’s relatives, and whoopee pies made of cream cheese and pumpkin cake.

In Prospect Heights, this cash-only neighborhood bar attracts guests with its cushioned deep couches, a long wooden communal table, and a small outdoor patio in the rear decorated in white Christmas lights.

The nation's first museum just for kids sports a new canary-yellow, Rafael Viñoly-designed upper level incorporating solar panels, and has display cases made of compressed sunflower seeds. See the permanent exhibit on Brooklyn's natural habitats (yes, New

This Coney Island fruit shop carries the gamut of fruit-based creations, from platters and baskets to chocolate-dipped fruits. Daniel Spitz started the shop in 1957, and his son Mitchell now runs the place (although Daniel continues to keep a close eye on operations).

An airy showcase for top fashion names such as Dries van Noten and Rick Owens. The shoe selection alone (Henry Beguelin, Ann Demeulemeester) inspires many a pilgrimage from Manhattan.

A sumptuous bed in the store's window is strewn with high-end lingerie (Cosabella, Eberjey, Leigh Bantivoglio) - perhaps the place should be called Stay Up All Night?

Furniture designer Sohrab Bakhshi packs this space with everything from aluminum World War II military cases to vintage clocks, plus Bakhshi's own creations (chandeliers made from water mains and motor-oil jars).

DJs at the Rub play only the best old-school hip-hop and pop jams, and the mostly-local crowd comes expecting to boogie ‘til the wee hours of the morning (wallflowers, skip this stop).

This wine and spirits shop in the Cobble Hill neighborhood of Brooklyn is beloved for many reasons — the great lengths its staff goes to please its customers, (first-timers get a tour of the store), an eclectic inventory that includes Middle Eastern and African products, seasonal seminars on bour