Brooklyn

Restaurants in Brooklyn

It’s nearly impossible to walk around without bumping into a critically-praised Brooklyn restaurant. The borough is teeming with everything from Michelin Star restaurants like the Chef’s Table at Brooklyn Fare and Blanca (hidden behind famed pizzeria, Roberta’s) to delicious on-the-go fare at Brooklyn’s many, many food festivals. In fact, every genre of food you can imagine can be found somewhere in the borough. If you simply can’t make up your mind when it comes to restaurants in Brooklyn, just explore the neighborhoods on foot. Visits to the Greenpoint and Williamsburg area are sure fire bets when it comes to finding great food. Both neighborhoods are home to dozens of great eateries that can be found by simply walking along Greenpoint’s Manhattan Avenue and the outsized commercial area bounded by Wythe Avenue, Driggs Avenue, McCarren Park and S. 5th Street in Williamsburg. Meanwhile, there’s another cluster of great eateries in the area that stretches from the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge to Prospect Park (i.e. DUMBO to Park Slope) and in the rapidly changing north-central Brooklyn neighborhoods of Crown Heights, Bed-Stuy, Clinton Hill and Fort Greene.

A spin-off of the Brooklyn Flea, this food-only market happens every Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on the waterfront adjacent to the East River State Park.

Beginning in a small corner restaurant in SoHo, this brainchild of brother-chefs Bruce and Eric Bromberg has expanded throughout the city including Brooklyn’s Park Slope, where signature fish and seafood dishes like smoked trout and paella mix with house specialties Maine lobster sashimi and chop

What good New Yorker doesn’t crave a 2 a.m. slice? Stroll to the Brooklyn outpost of Joe’s Pizza where Park Slope’s partiers finish their nights with tasty thin-crust renditions of classics like tomato, fresh mozzarella and basil, or barbeque chicken pizza.

The atmosphere of this Sardinian enoteca in downtown Williamsburg breathes cozy, old-world rusticity with aged hardwood floors, woodblock tables, brass finishings, tapered candles, a tin-paneled ceiling, and cushioned banquettes.

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As the first Brooklyn location of this small chain of Thai restaurants, it is also the largest at 7,500 square feet. Filled with materials like wood, brick, slate, concrete, and wrought iron, the dining room’s décor is a combination of industrial chic and art deco.

Located just north of Prospect Park in Brooklyn, this pizzeria offers crispy, thin-crust slices of New York pie staples along with specialty versions like goat cheese and bruschetta on whole wheat, smoked mozzarella with provolone and prosciutto, and vodka sauce with fresh mozzarella.

Originally intended as a simple neighborhood eatery, owners Sharon Pachter and Charles Kiely have gained recognition for executing a small menu of seasonally focused dishes drawn from locally sourced produce.

At Mile End Delicatessen, in Brooklyn, Noah and Rae Bernamoff serve Montreal-style bagels; Noah is from Montreal and, as is typical, thinks their bagels are better than New York’s. New York's are hard, boiled, the hole irregular; theirs is softer, sweeter, as if a metaphor for Canadian life.

This tiny Vietnamese sandwich shop in Sunset Park may appear somewhat disheveled and ramshackled, but its cheap, delicious sandwiches account for the intense crowding at lunch times.

This farmhouse-inspired restaurant in Prospect Heights brings a distinct countryside spirit to the city with displayed farm equipment, 19th-century portraits, empty bell jars, and filament bulbs inside a long, black and white dining room with high ceilings.