Brooklyn

Restaurants in Brooklyn

It’s nearly impossible to walk around without bumping into a critically-praised Brooklyn restaurant. The borough is teeming with everything from Michelin Star restaurants like the Chef’s Table at Brooklyn Fare and Blanca (hidden behind famed pizzeria, Roberta’s) to delicious on-the-go fare at Brooklyn’s many, many food festivals. In fact, every genre of food you can imagine can be found somewhere in the borough. If you simply can’t make up your mind when it comes to restaurants in Brooklyn, just explore the neighborhoods on foot. Visits to the Greenpoint and Williamsburg area are sure fire bets when it comes to finding great food. Both neighborhoods are home to dozens of great eateries that can be found by simply walking along Greenpoint’s Manhattan Avenue and the outsized commercial area bounded by Wythe Avenue, Driggs Avenue, McCarren Park and S. 5th Street in Williamsburg. Meanwhile, there’s another cluster of great eateries in the area that stretches from the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge to Prospect Park (i.e. DUMBO to Park Slope) and in the rapidly changing north-central Brooklyn neighborhoods of Crown Heights, Bed-Stuy, Clinton Hill and Fort Greene.

A spin-off of the Brooklyn Flea, this food-only market happens every Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on the waterfront adjacent to the East River State Park.

Run by Korean-born chef Sohui Kim, The Good Fork serves up Asian-inspired dishes for dinner and a weekend brunch. This Red Hook restaurant's interior mirrors the neighborhood: the dining tables and dining room were built by chef Kim's carpenter-actor husband, Ben Schneider, creating an overall wo

Bryan Calvert, chef and co- owner of James in Brooklyn, New York, loves the versatility of his supermoist lemon pound cake: He uses it to make everything from French toast to a stuffing for baked apples.

13 vendors sell Honduran tacos, Mexican huaraches, Ecuadoran ceviche, and other delicious treats to spectators and players alike (a semi-pro league holds matches here every weekend).

 

open all day Sat. and Sun., mid-April to mid-October

What It’s Like: As classic as a string of pearls, this New York jewel—in a perfect setting on the East River under the Brooklyn Bridge—has romanced diners since it opened its doors in 1977.

This small restaurant — painted in the bright yellow, green, and white of the Jamaican flag — specializes in Caribbean-style patties. The crispy pastries are stuffed with a mixture of allspice, black pepper, and a choice of seasoned ground beef, chicken, or cabbage and potatoes.

Andy Ricker is a Vermont native who fell in love with the food of Chiang Mai and northwest Thailand, opened a slew of restaurants in Portland, OR, and was named the James Beard Best Chef of the Northwest in 2011.

Housed in a former storefront church in Red Hook, this renowned bakery is the brainchild of Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito, two veterans of the advertising industry.

Beginning in a small corner restaurant in SoHo, this brainchild of brother-chefs Bruce and Eric Bromberg has expanded throughout the city including Brooklyn’s Park Slope, where signature fish and seafood dishes like smoked trout and paella mix with house specialties Maine lobster sashimi and chop

What good New Yorker doesn’t crave a 2 a.m. slice? Stroll to the Brooklyn outpost of Joe’s Pizza where Park Slope’s partiers finish their nights with tasty thin-crust renditions of classics like tomato, fresh mozzarella and basil, or barbeque chicken pizza.

The atmosphere of this Sardinian enoteca in downtown Williamsburg breathes cozy, old-world rusticity with aged hardwood floors, woodblock tables, brass finishings, tapered candles, a tin-paneled ceiling, and cushioned banquettes.

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As the first Brooklyn location of this small chain of Thai restaurants, it is also the largest at 7,500 square feet. Filled with materials like wood, brick, slate, concrete, and wrought iron, the dining room’s décor is a combination of industrial chic and art deco.