Brooklyn

Brooklyn Travel Guide

The last ten years have seen Brooklyn, New York City’s most populous borough, transformed into one of the most talked-about locales in the world and deservedly so. Travel to Brooklyn and see why the borough continues to be a hotbed of culture, art, music and food and why its residents are so proud to live there. Gastronomes will find some of the city’s best eateries and bars eagerly serving up a mixture of diverse fare while dozens of homespun galleries and music venues showcase the works of Brooklyn’s many creatives. Brooklyn travel is also filled to the brim with amazing sites like the incomparable Brooklyn Bridge and picturesque green spaces like McCarren and Prospect Parks, which are a world away from the hustle and bustle of the city. Visit Brooklyn to discover a borough that is home to a diverse set of neighborhoods and ethnic enclaves, each with its own distinct personality. Use Travel + Leisure’s Brooklyn travel guide and see why this classic New York City borough is a destination in its own right.

Things Not to Miss in Brooklyn

• Walk across the Brooklyn Bridge and spend the day exploring the neighborhoods of Brooklyn Heights, Vinegar Hill and DUMBO
 • Go for a picnic in Prospect Park, created in 1867, and visit surrounding neighborhoods like Park Slope, Windsor Terrace and Prospect Heights
 • Get authentic Polish food in Greenpoint or indulge in all things West Indian in Crown Heights
 • Pay a visit to the Brooklyn Museum, the Brooklyn Historical Society and local cemeteries like Greenwood and Evergreen
 • Stroll down Bedford, Berry and Wythe Avenues, the main drags of Williamsburg
 • Spend the day exploring the post-industrial neighborhoods of Red Hook and Gowanus
 • Admire Brooklyn's fabled brownstones in the Cobble Hill neighborhood
 • Eat to your heart’s content at the Brooklyn Flea
 • Explore the best of hip Brooklyn in East Williamsburg and Bushwick
 • Drink up at local breweries like Brooklyn Brewery, Other Half, Dirck The Norseman and nearby Transmitter Brewery

When to Go to Brooklyn

Like the rest of New York City, Brooklyn experiences warm-to-hot summers and cold, sometimes frigid winters. The city’s position between the Appalachian Mountains and the Atlantic Ocean does spare it from bearing the full brunt of cold snaps. Still, Brooklyn experiences a well-defined winter season, with temperatures taking a dive in early November and staying in the 30s and 40s well into early April. With that in mind, visitors should plan their trip to Brooklyn in early summer, between May and early July, or early fall, between late August and September, when the weather is most agreeable and visitors can leave heavy winter coats and scarves back at home.

Articles about Brooklyn

Maribel Lieberman, owner of the MarieBelle chocolate shops, travels the world scouting the best quality beans for her masterful confections. As she prepares to open her newest shop, Cacao Market, Lieberman talks to T+L about sourcing trips, the in...
It’s the middle of February. In the dead of winter. In New York City. Finding an activity for my kids that we haven’t done, to paraphrase my son, “One-hundred times already,” has become a desperate scenario. When you live in a two-bedroom apartmen...
For Radmila Karlić, a day’s work means leading her dogs into the dense Motovun forest of Istria, Croatia, to hunt for truffles. She carries a small shovel, ready to dig up the edible treasures the dogs sniff at the roots of the towering oak trees....
We’re calling it: paint is out, dynamically papered walls are in. The folks at Flavor Paper—the Brooklyn-based print lab turning out some of the world’s most interesting patterns right now—have taken things a step further with a new collection of ...
Style, in a way, functions as a kind of sociocultural GPS, a psychic location finder. You can tell you’re in Paris, of course, because that’s the spire of the Eiffel Tower piercing the sky and there, in the distance, is Notre Dame, with its bell t...
See More Global Hot Spots Anyone who grew up in New York has a “remember when” story about the city’s restless landscape. Remember when Hudson Street in TriBeCa was stoplight-free? Or Harlem didn’t have a cineplex? Or a bike ride across the bridg...
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The 1970’s The traveler’s map sure looked different in T+L’s first decade. Future hot spots like Shanghai, Prague, Moscow, and Saigon were still well beyond the pale, but Americans were heading to Burma, to Iran (then booming under the shah), and...
Since 2008, the market has grown from a DIY experiment in a public-school parking lot to an indie shopping mecca with spin-offs around the borough. Here, we explore its original location, in the historic Fort Greene neighborhood. Olde Good Things...
To want to understand Brooklyn is to presume to understand the world: it isn't merely difficult, it's impossible. From Manhattan, Brooklyn seems a mist of buildings promising a life of neighborhoods and lower rents—an easier life, one where you ma...