British Columbia

Things to do in British Columbia

For winter sports lovers, Whistler is one of the most popular destinations not just in British Columbia, but in all of North America. Visitors can ski, snowboard, zip-line, ice skate, bungee jump and more in this lovely town, the host of the 2010 Winter Olympics. After hitting the slope, there’s a wonderful array of activities, too: from shopping to dining to dancing the night away at a club. Adventurous travelers looking for things to do in British Columbia will also love the Capilano Suspension Bridge Park, (where they can walk along the 230 ft tall and 450 ft long bridge above the river) and the Juan de Fuca Marine Trail, a gorgeous hiking route lined with beaches, tide pools, picnic areas and breathtaking landscapes.

Speaking of great views, don’t miss Glacier National Park, where mountains, caves, rivers and active glaciers create a spectacular experience. For a more low-key approach to nature, spend the day at one of Victoria’s pretty beaches, like Cordova Bay and Gonzales. For a taste of British Columbia’s most vibrant side, head to the beautiful city of Vancouver. With a rich cultural side (expect opera, theater, and film happenings, as well as art and design fairs throughout the year), excellent restaurants and bars, and an eco-friendly lifestyle, it brings together all of the greatest things to do in British Columbia.

In the Victorian neighborhood of Gastown, this three-story Native American art gallery showcases ceremonial masks and totem poles, limited-edition prints, and bentwood boxes. The beaded moccasins and hand-carved “talking sticks” make for great souvenirs.

What started as a tiny consignment shop in the indie district around King Edward Avenue has grown into the neighborhood’s premiere boutique for all things antique and secondhand. Find vintage leather clutches and bags alongside baby toys, kitchenware, printed stationery, and more.

One of the five largest film festivals in North America, the two-week Vancouver International Film Festival (VIFF) was first founded in 1982.

The Pacific Northwest’s cool waters are teeming with colorful, fascinating sea-life—and the recently expanded Vancouver Aquarium brings these abundant creatures into easy view.

Hand-made leather goods such as bags, boots, and accessories.

Housed inside the international terminal inside the Vancouver International Airport, The Spirit of Haida Gwaii, known as the Jade Canoe, is the second bronze casting of this famous sculpture.

The namesake owner of this 1995-opened gallery is passionate about the First Nations artists whose work he carries.

The mountain has the longest lift-serviced descent in North America, at 5,620 feet.

Operating in False Creek since 1982, this ferry service is the original one providing transport aboard its fleet of 10 vessels, which includes four 20-passenger diesel-powered ferries. The Little Blue Ferries offers routes to several destinations, including the Maritime Museum, Stamps Landing, an

Olympic Pedigree: Snowboarding and freestyle skiing in 2010, and site of Shaun “Flying Tomato” White’s likely total domination of the half-pipe à la Turin 2006.

 

A single- or two-person sea kayak paddle around False Creek is a terrific way to spot some of Vancouver’s landmarks—including the still-under-construction athletes’ village for the Winter 2010 Olympic Games.

Since its modest beginnings in 1978, this summer festival has grown to become one of Canada's biggest music events.

Vancouver-based chain offering yoga-inspired athletic gear.

Canadian artist Lutz Haufschild created this 131-foot-long stained glass panel inspired by the iconic Hokusai painting The Great Wave off Kanagawa. Using thousands of pieces of aqua and green-hued glass, this piece reflects sunlight as if it were shining off the ocean.

Caban, part of the Club Monaco chain, mixes contemporary furnishings, linens, and tableware with spare, sleek designs.