British Columbia

Things to do in British Columbia

For winter sports lovers, Whistler is one of the most popular destinations not just in British Columbia, but in all of North America. Visitors can ski, snowboard, zip-line, ice skate, bungee jump and more in this lovely town, the host of the 2010 Winter Olympics. After hitting the slope, there’s a wonderful array of activities, too: from shopping to dining to dancing the night away at a club. Adventurous travelers looking for things to do in British Columbia will also love the Capilano Suspension Bridge Park, (where they can walk along the 230 ft tall and 450 ft long bridge above the river) and the Juan de Fuca Marine Trail, a gorgeous hiking route lined with beaches, tide pools, picnic areas and breathtaking landscapes.

Speaking of great views, don’t miss Glacier National Park, where mountains, caves, rivers and active glaciers create a spectacular experience. For a more low-key approach to nature, spend the day at one of Victoria’s pretty beaches, like Cordova Bay and Gonzales. For a taste of British Columbia’s most vibrant side, head to the beautiful city of Vancouver. With a rich cultural side (expect opera, theater, and film happenings, as well as art and design fairs throughout the year), excellent restaurants and bars, and an eco-friendly lifestyle, it brings together all of the greatest things to do in British Columbia.

Located in the Vancouver International Airport, just past security in the U.S. Terminal, this outpost of the Canadian brand sells a selection of the company's quality leather goods and clothing items. Founded in 1973, the brand uses the quintessential Canadian animal, the beaver, as its logo.

Established in 1931, the Vancouver Art Gallery is the largest in Western Canada, and showcases the works of primarily regional artists, with some international contributions, as well.

Housed in the historical Crawford Block building in Edmonton, Gravity Pope has supported local fashion designers and collections since 1992.

Founder Chip Wilson opened the flagship store of his global yoga apparel chain, Lululemon Kitsilano, back in 2000. The brand is known for fashion-forward workout gear that bridges the yoga studio/street wear divide.

Who needs Sundance?  Hollywood sophisticates hit the slopes (and the silver screen) during the annual Whistler Film Festival.

Many of Granville Island’s most interesting shops are actually located outside the boundaries of the Public Market.

Mission Hill is one of the most impressive wineries anywhere—a reported $26 million investment by the owner of Mike's Hard Lemonade—set on a rise above Okanagan Lake.

Located pre-security on level three in the international departures wing of the Vancouver International Airport, this shop sells a selection of uniquely Canadian food gifts.

Set on the main drag of trendy Gastown, this high-end showroom carries contemporary furniture, lighting, and accessories from high-end brands like B&B Italia, Vitra, Carl Hansen & Son, Baccarat, and more.

Share a gelato while strolling the flower-carpeted 55 acres complete with traditional Japanese, Italian, and English rose sections.

This Prohibition-era inspired restaurant and bar overlooks the Maple Tree Square section of historic Gastown. Owned by a handful of bartending veterans, the intimate, neighborhood venue serves Asian-influenced small plates like bánh mì and gyoza.

At the McAbee Fossil Beds site, lake sediments that formed 50 million years ago now hold the fossilized imprints of more than 50 plant varieties. Fish and insect fossils the likes of wasps, leafhoppers, and mooneye fish are other finds.

Vancouverites have a never-ending love affair with this 1,000-acre spread of temperate rainforest, which occupies the entire northwest end of Vancouver’s downtown peninsula.

The winery comes alive each summer with a sunset concert series and a restaurant serving game sausages and other wine-friendly food at lunch.

A spindle whorl is a stone disc that serves as a weight to maintain the momentum of a spindle in a spinning wheel. This one, carved out of Canadian red cedar by indigenous artist Susan A. Point, is a mammoth example that represents the art of the Coast Salish, a First Nations tribe.