Brazil Travel Guide

One of the city’s coolest electronic-music clubs, D-Edge attracts partiers with a wild dance room that makes you feel like you’re inside a giant Rubik’s Cube.

The cozy, tiled Original elevates draft beer to high science. The brew (small-bubbled Brahma) rests in iceberg-cold tanks for at least two days to settle the head.

Skinny pants, diaphanous camis, and slinky tube dresses in eye-popping orange and fuchsia fill the racks at this younger, hipper sister to Brazilian designer line Maria Bonita.

With its soaring tin roof and stained-glass windows, the century-old Manaus fish market is nothing if not a temple dedicated to Amazonian biodiversity, a museum of the soon-to-be-eaten, illuminated by strings of hanging 15-watt bulbs.

Some of Rio's most beautiful—and well-preserved—colonial architecture can be found in these adjacent up-and-coming neighborhoods.

Originally founded in 1636, this church was rebuilt in Neoclassical style in 1828.

If you’ve been putting off a visit to the dentist, this spotless dental office will clean your teeth, whiten, and take X-rays for a fraction of the U.S. price ($40-$60). The doc is in from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily.

Texas-based HomeAway lists 30 properties along the coconut grove–lined coast, and its "rent with confidence" guarantee refunds unsatisfied guests up to $5,000 per booking.

Galeria Melissa is a mecca for plastic and rubber footwear. Expect stylish sandals, sneakers, and kitten heels by Vivienne Westwood, Karim Rashid, and Jason Wu, among others; the rotating installations by local artists at the massive entranceway draw even the non-shoe obsessed.

Guarulhos Airport seriously lacks world-class shopping, something it must rectify before Brazil hosts the 2014 World Cup; but for now, this jewelry shop and art gallery is the best bet for coming away with some memorable items.

Rent a car at the airport—it’s an hour to Trancoso—or hire a driver ($113) through Mangue Alto Turismo. Owner Henrique Costa speaks fluent English and knows the region well.

Although not quite a thousand, there are more than a hundred flavors of natural ice creams and sorbets at this shop near the Jardim Botânico. Mil Frutas makes its frozen desserts by hand, when fruits like the tropical jungle cupuaçu and berries from the açaí palm are in-season.