Brazil

Brazil Travel Guide

The options of things to do in Brazil are endless because the country is so diverse. For starters, it’s home to the most biologically diverse habitat in the world, the Amazon rainforest. Guided tours and walks, flyovers and more are available to let you explore this incredible habitat in your own chosen way. Meanwhile, the cities of Brazil contain an intensity and diversity of urban experiences that can’t be matched elsewhere. Americans walking through the streets of São Paulo or Rio de Janeiro might be reminded of a mashup of New York and New Orleans, with nightlife to match.

Activities in Brazil aren’t limited to wildlife and nightlife. There’s also culture, from the São Paulo Museum of Art is an architectural masterpiece. Inside, find collections of contemporary, local, African, indigenous, and Asian art. But if that doesn’t hold your interest, you could take a closer look at the gigantic statue of Christ the Redeemer that towers over Rio, take the cable car to the top of the Sugarloaf Mountain, or visit São Paulo’s glorious Ibirapuera Park.

Nightclub?Bar?Furniture warehouse?It defies description, but if you go to only one place, check out Rio Scenarium—two adjacent three-story buildings full of multiple dance floors, lounge areas, cocktail stations, and, yes, antiques (the club moonlights as a furniture-rental house for TV and film

In the evening, "urban bossa" and other live music entertains an energetic crowd .

Years as agent: 8. Other specialty: Family reunions. Consulting fee: $50 a day, not above $500 total. bobby@matuete.com

A typical airport bookstore with a limited selection of English paperbacks and a lot of people flipping through Caras, one of Brazil’s best-known gossip rags.

The bar where, legend has it, Antonio Carlos Jobim and Vinícius de Morais wrote the song The Girl from Ipanema, and where you can still hear live bossa nova.

Among the diapers and canned hearts of palm are dozens of Havaianas at only $6 a pair (a fourth of the cost on the Quadrado).

Above the city's fray in the boho-chic hilltop neighborhood of Santa Teresa sits a tiny shop specializing in native crafts. Loosely woven cotton rugs in sorbet shades are stacked next to 1920's photos of Corcovado Mountain. Also of note: sterling-silver jewelry.

Years as agent: 12. Other Specialties: Brazil, El Salvador, Amazon River cruises. Consulting fee: $350.

Vast palm-lined avenues lead to groves of cocoa and rubber trees. Giant Amazonian water lilies—some more than three feet across—float in ponds.