Restaurants in Brazil

Satyricon displays its fresh catches—including lobster, oysters, shrimp, and whole fish—near the restaurant entrance, and it cooks up this South Atlantic seafood into Italian- and Mediterranean-style dishes. The house specialty is the pargo, or fish crusted in rock salt and baked.

Chef Edinho Engel started the Cambury dining revolution 18 years ago when he opened the restaurant in the rain forest at the end of a 50-foot boardwalk.

Helena Rizzo is a Brazilian model turned chef; her husband, Daniel Redondo, is the former chef of Celler de Can Roca, in Girona, Spain, Europe’s epicenter of avant-garde cuisine.

Flavors of the Mediterranean (Provençal risotto with octopus, crisp goat-cheese and lavender-honey salad) have zingy Asian accents (shiitake-mushroom fricassee with Asian spring rolls) at this favorite among chic Leblon residents.

Not only is this the spot to sample Brazil’s most decadent chocolate, but this small chocolataria and café is also the airport’s hottest stop for a standing-room-only caffeine jolt.

A Jardins steak house legendary for its Saturday feijoada buffet.

A required stop for foodies (and big-name chefs from Alain Ducasse to Ferran Adrià), D.O.M. serves a tasting menu by pioneering chef Alex Atala that showcases Brazilian flavors.

The spare, blond-wood interior will have you thinking you took a wrong turn to Stockholm, but the food is all about the tropical accents: foie gras in a citrus coulis, cod with ginger-coconut sauce. The wine list ranges from neighboring Chile and Argentina to Languedoc.

The sushi in São Paulo is top-notch.