Brazil

Restaurants in Brazil

Brazil is one of the worlds most ethnically and culturally diverse places, and the country’s food offerings are no exception. Did you know, for instance, that Brazil has the largest Japanese community outside of Japan? Many live in São Paulo, which is consequently a great place to find sushi and other Japanese staples. Try out Kinoshita to get a taste of the best. They serve up a mix of modern dishes like seared foie gras, with classic Japanese fare like the traditional nigiri sushi (a ball of vinegared rice with seafood on top). Or, try wafer-thin tempura and deep-fried vegetables. Brazil restaurants offer diversity and something new to try for all types of travelers.

For a taste of the country’s native food culture, try Figueira Rubaiyat in São Paulo. It’s here where you can find a delicious version feijoada, Brazil’s national dish that’s a stew of black beans and salted pork. At this restaurant, you’ll also find great fish and seafood dishes, including native species like Pirarucu. Other classic dishes to try are vatapá (made of bread, shrimp, coconut milk, and ground peanuts), moqueca (a slow-cooked fish stew with ingredients like coconut milk, tomatoes, onions, garlic, and coriander), and polenta. Traditionally, meals consist of rice and beans, with fried meats, cheeses, potato, and banana being served at lunch. Not that we’re objecting to fried foods, but if you’re craving something fresh, Brazil is abundant in fruits like acai, mango, papaya, passion fruit, and guava. No matter which restaurants in Brazil that you dine at, there’s sure to be a nice selection of locally sourced foods.

The sushi chefs at this hotspot slice fish inside a VW bus.

It's Carnivale for carnivores at this riodizio-style churrascaria, where beach-tanned waiters slice up skewer after skewer of beef, pork, or poultry until you flip a coaster that says "stop." To supplement your protein bonanza, help yourself to the salad bar, which features hearts of palm and sus

Using Brazilian ingredients like cassava and açaí, chef Claude Troisgros (a generation of the family famous for attaining Michelin stars) produces French cuisine that’s considered some of the best in Rio.

Maria Sylvia Esteves Calazans Luz came from São Paulo to Trancoso in 1974 at the age of 32. She was soon cooking elaborate meals for guests at her beachfront cottage on the Praia do Espelho.

Known for its piled-sky-high mortadella sandwich and flaky pastel de bacalhau (salt-cod pastries).

Satyricon displays its fresh catches—including lobster, oysters, shrimp, and whole fish—near the restaurant entrance, and it cooks up this South Atlantic seafood into Italian- and Mediterranean-style dishes. The house specialty is the pargo, or fish crusted in rock salt and baked.

Flavors of the Mediterranean (Provençal risotto with octopus, crisp goat-cheese and lavender-honey salad) have zingy Asian accents (shiitake-mushroom fricassee with Asian spring rolls) at this favorite among chic Leblon residents.

Not only is this the spot to sample Brazil’s most decadent chocolate, but this small chocolataria and café is also the airport’s hottest stop for a standing-room-only caffeine jolt.

The spare, blond-wood interior will have you thinking you took a wrong turn to Stockholm, but the food is all about the tropical accents: foie gras in a citrus coulis, cod with ginger-coconut sauce. The wine list ranges from neighboring Chile and Argentina to Languedoc.