Brazil

Restaurants in Brazil

Brazil is one of the worlds most ethnically and culturally diverse places, and the country’s food offerings are no exception. Did you know, for instance, that Brazil has the largest Japanese community outside of Japan? Many live in São Paulo, which is consequently a great place to find sushi and other Japanese staples. Try out Kinoshita to get a taste of the best. They serve up a mix of modern dishes like seared foie gras, with classic Japanese fare like the traditional nigiri sushi (a ball of vinegared rice with seafood on top). Or, try wafer-thin tempura and deep-fried vegetables. Brazil restaurants offer diversity and something new to try for all types of travelers.

For a taste of the country’s native food culture, try Figueira Rubaiyat in São Paulo. It’s here where you can find a delicious version feijoada, Brazil’s national dish that’s a stew of black beans and salted pork. At this restaurant, you’ll also find great fish and seafood dishes, including native species like Pirarucu. Other classic dishes to try are vatapá (made of bread, shrimp, coconut milk, and ground peanuts), moqueca (a slow-cooked fish stew with ingredients like coconut milk, tomatoes, onions, garlic, and coriander), and polenta. Traditionally, meals consist of rice and beans, with fried meats, cheeses, potato, and banana being served at lunch. Not that we’re objecting to fried foods, but if you’re craving something fresh, Brazil is abundant in fruits like acai, mango, papaya, passion fruit, and guava. No matter which restaurants in Brazil that you dine at, there’s sure to be a nice selection of locally sourced foods.

Restaurants don’t get any cooler—or more Brazilian—than this current cult spot owned by 30-year-old Rodrigo Oliveira.

After a lunch of fresh ceviche at this beachside hotel bar, take to the daybeds overlooking the surf. In the main dining room try a subtle moqueca, paired with piquant pirão (a sauce of tomato, puréed fish, garlic, and olive oil).

Chef Edinho Engel started the Cambury dining revolution 18 years ago when he opened the restaurant in the rain forest at the end of a 50-foot boardwalk.

Helena Rizzo is a Brazilian model turned chef; her husband, Daniel Redondo, is the former chef of Celler de Can Roca, in Girona, Spain, Europe’s epicenter of avant-garde cuisine.

A required stop for foodies (and big-name chefs from Alain Ducasse to Ferran Adrià), D.O.M. serves a tasting menu by pioneering chef Alex Atala that showcases Brazilian flavors.

The family has run restaurants in São Paulo since 1902, and a fourth-generation member of the Fasanos heads the Italian fare and classically styled dining room at Gero. Outside, the single-story brick building looks rather basic.

This Quadrado fixture has French doors, paddle fans, and a vine-draped courtyard. Chef Sandra Marques—a São Paulo émigré—excels at fish dishes like salmon in leek sauce with black rice.

Whether thirsting for Brazilian espumante (sparkling wine) or Krug, the cognoscenti of Carioca—as locals are known—head to this champagnheria

Sao

It's Carnivale for carnivores at this riodizio-style churrascaria, where beach-tanned waiters slice up skewer after skewer of beef, pork, or poultry until you flip a coaster that says "stop." To supplement your protein bonanza, help yourself to the salad bar, which features hearts of palm and sus