Brazil

Restaurants in Brazil

Brazil is one of the worlds most ethnically and culturally diverse places, and the country’s food offerings are no exception. Did you know, for instance, that Brazil has the largest Japanese community outside of Japan? Many live in São Paulo, which is consequently a great place to find sushi and other Japanese staples. Try out Kinoshita to get a taste of the best. They serve up a mix of modern dishes like seared foie gras, with classic Japanese fare like the traditional nigiri sushi (a ball of vinegared rice with seafood on top). Or, try wafer-thin tempura and deep-fried vegetables. Brazil restaurants offer diversity and something new to try for all types of travelers.

For a taste of the country’s native food culture, try Figueira Rubaiyat in São Paulo. It’s here where you can find a delicious version feijoada, Brazil’s national dish that’s a stew of black beans and salted pork. At this restaurant, you’ll also find great fish and seafood dishes, including native species like Pirarucu. Other classic dishes to try are vatapá (made of bread, shrimp, coconut milk, and ground peanuts), moqueca (a slow-cooked fish stew with ingredients like coconut milk, tomatoes, onions, garlic, and coriander), and polenta. Traditionally, meals consist of rice and beans, with fried meats, cheeses, potato, and banana being served at lunch. Not that we’re objecting to fried foods, but if you’re craving something fresh, Brazil is abundant in fruits like acai, mango, papaya, passion fruit, and guava. No matter which restaurants in Brazil that you dine at, there’s sure to be a nice selection of locally sourced foods.

A perfect lunch destination for Ipanema shoppers. In the tastefully underdone, concrete-floored space, genial young staffers serve Italian standards both traditional (pizza alla Margherita) and adventurous (tramezzini with salmon tartare).

Tuck into the ultra-cheesy pies from the infernal wood-burning oven and the pleasantly oily Calabrian sausage bread.

The local intelligentsia frequent Filial, where schoppe (draft beer) flows into the wee hours.

Prior to the opening of this bar, Brazil’s best microbrews didn’t wander too far from the German-speaking south.

A Jardins steak house legendary for its Saturday feijoada buffet.

The most popular bar pre-security is nothing special whatsoever, but there are cold chopes (Brazilian draft beer), stiff martinis, and a whole lot of hoopla depending on which soccer match is being shown on the flat-screen TVs.