Brazil

Things to do in Brazil

The options of things to do in Brazil are endless because the country is so diverse. For starters, it’s home to the most biologically diverse habitat in the world, the Amazon rainforest. Guided tours and walks, flyovers and more are available to let you explore this incredible habitat in your own chosen way. Meanwhile, the cities of Brazil contain an intensity and diversity of urban experiences that can’t be matched elsewhere. Americans walking through the streets of São Paulo or Rio de Janeiro might be reminded of a mashup of New York and New Orleans, with nightlife to match.

Activities in Brazil aren’t limited to wildlife and nightlife. There’s also culture, from the São Paulo Museum of Art is an architectural masterpiece. Inside, find collections of contemporary, local, African, indigenous, and Asian art. But if that doesn’t hold your interest, you could take a closer look at the gigantic statue of Christ the Redeemer that towers over Rio, take the cable car to the top of the Sugarloaf Mountain, or visit São Paulo’s glorious Ibirapuera Park.

Among the diapers and canned hearts of palm are dozens of Havaianas at only $6 a pair (a fourth of the cost on the Quadrado).

This small spa steeped in Asian aesthetics and L’Occitane products is the best (okay, the only) spot to relax away a layover with a shiatsu massage, reflexology, a new do, or even a Brazilian bikini wax. There is a smaller version in Terminal 2 near Gate 22. Treatments from $12.

Vast palm-lined avenues lead to groves of cocoa and rubber trees. Giant Amazonian water lilies—some more than three feet across—float in ponds.

The seventeenth-century church combines Neoclassical interiors with Baroque and Rococo carvings located in the sacristy.

The three-story shop features cutting-edge local Brazilian clothing designs, luxe wood interiors, and a bird aviary.

Espelho is one of Bahia’s loveliest beaches, a vivid collage of blue water, creamy yellow sand, red cliffs, and lush green forest. Driftwood and coconuts wash up with the tide. Rivers and streams emerge from nowhere to snake into the sea.

Atop one of the city's highest peaks, the world-renowned statue of Christ the Redeemer gives way to 360-degree views. Take the 123-year-old Corcovado train to the summit, or better, hire a taxi and ride the twisting road through the Tijuca rain forest. Halfway up, stop and listen.

This sultry samba club has nightly live music.

A nightclub-cum-antiques store.