Boston

Boston Travel Guide

Whether you’re short, tall, curvy or skinny, in-jean-ius has the right denim to fit your body. The North End boutique stocks more than 30 brands of designer jeans, including Joe’s Jeans, Citizens of Humanity, Rock & Republic, Chip & Pepper, and Sacred Blue.

Now a local institution, this family-owned fishmonger shop was originally founded by Master Mariner Captain Roy Wilfred Marden in 1945. Today, the store also includes an adjacent restaurant called the Captain’s Table & Takeaway.

Offering a taste of Latin America, this Harrison Avenue boutique features a unique collection of design imports. Hand-selected by owner Frank Campanale, all pieces originate in such South American countries as Brazil, Argentina, Peru, and Chile.

This small, five-year-old company promotes carbon-neutral activities and donates five percent of each trip’s revenues to local communities.  T+L Trip pick South Africa Fair-Trade Safari.

The Museum: The museum known as MOBA will never be mistaken for its acronymically similarly New York cousin, MoMA, or the Museum of Modern Art.

The name doesn’t lie: this chic women’s shop is the place to find a perfect party dress—as well as comfortable but stylish T-shirts. Beautiful pieces by hard-to-find designers, such as Vanessa Bruno and Lyell, fill the racks in the muted pink showroom.

On the southern fringe of Boston's Back Bay resides one of the city’s most beautiful open spaces. A tranquil, 700-foot-long reflecting pool stretches out across Christian Science Plaza, which is home to two churches. Completed in 1894 by architect Franklin I.

This kitschy, retro faux-dive, where a giant model airplane hangs from the antique tin ceiling, is hugely popular with post-college hipsters and others who appreciate excellent vintage cocktails.

Cherry almond biscotti, pistachio butter cookies, raspberry macaroons, German chocolate gelato: with such a menu, it’s easy to understand why Mike’s Pastry is one of the most popular places to indulge in Boston’s North End.

The first museum built in Boston in more than a century, the Institute of Contemporary Art opened in Fort Point in 2006. The museum houses a performing arts theater, education and workshop facilities, and a generous amount of gallery space.

After one taste of this little market’s enormous bocadillos (traditional Spanish sandwiches), patrons are likely to be grabbing ingredients off the store’s shelves in order to recreate the dish at home.

With the help of their team of industry experts, chef Barbara Lynch and wine director Cat Silirie run this demonstration kitchen with the goal of offering enriching, educational events like special wine dinners, cooking demonstrations, and dinners with visiting chefs.

Located in the South End, this contemporary art gallery is the creation of founders Camilo Alvarez, a New York City transplant, and Alexandra Cherubini, a Boston native.

The home field of the Boston Red Sox is a vivid throwback to the golden era of baseball.