Boston

Restaurants in Boston

Because it sits on coastline, Boston is a seafood city. New England clam chowder (with clams, potatoes, and onions), baked haddock, lobster rolls, and oyster stew are popular surf dishes. New England boiled dinner (corned beef with cabbage and root vegetables), bulkie rolls, and American chop suey are prevalent turf options. If you want traditionally-prepared Boston seafood, get a table at the Island Creek Oyster Bar on Commonwealth Ave. They have one of the best raw oyster bars in Boston and a menu filled with lobster rolls, oyster sliders, fish and chips, and seafood casserole.

Boston, also home to a big Latino population, is just as likely to serve seafood paella and mofongo as they are clams. Orinoco, with locations in South End, Brookline Village, and Harvard Square, has been voted Boston’s best Latin American restaurant for the past three years. Feast on arepas and empanadas over Sunday brunch. Try Formaggio Kitchen for the best selection of imported cheeses and cured meats in town, or the Hi-Rise Bread Company for baguettes and specialty breads. Some other notable foods to try are Boston baked beans (flavored with maple syrup and bacon) and delicious Boston crème pie.

Renowned chef Barbara Lynch, also the owner of Boston’s B&G Oysters and No. 9 Park, draws on her on own memories of traveling in France and Italy to create an innovative dining experience at this Shawmut eatery.

Below the Boston Center for the Arts' historic Cyclorama sits The Beehive, an underground eatery, bar, and music venue.

Located in the theater district, Pigalle is named after the Parisian red light district and features French-inspired cuisine from chef-owner Marc Orfaly, who also incorporates his own blend of international influences.

Latin and Caribbean background beats set the tone at this rum-centric cocktail lounge in the InterContinental Boston hotel.

Housed in a former bank in Union Square, this community-minded café is known for its well-crafted Intelligentsia coffee drinks, gourmet soups and sandwiches, and environmentally friendly practices, which include recycling.

At any given time, a young crowd of students and locals can be found lounging in armchairs, armed with laptops and java, at this Harvard Square cafe.

A sophisticated South End standout, Union Bar and Grille combines inventive New American cuisine from executive chef Seth Woods and chef de cuisine Keenan Langlois with a rustic-chic interior designed by Peter Niemitz.

When I first discovered this spot—my stomach grumbling, my wallet light—I nearly wept with joy at the sight of so many steaming, piled up entrees set before me, some for as little as $4.00 a plate.

After the 2008 recession left three local university grads without a job, they banded together to bring Boston the French-fried dinner of your dreams.

This itty-bitty Back Bay corner cafe is best known for waking up the busy Bostonian with a perfectly crafted breakfast sandwich.

Hiding in plain sight on Hanover Street, this Italian joint lets you sate your appetite (and clog your arteries) for not much more than the change you’ll find at the bottom of your purse. Everything on the menu is under $5, from pizza to panini sandwiches and calzones.

Never judge a dive bar by its gaudy awning and glaring neon signs. This Allston watering hole’s 30-tap beer wall and daily deals are too good and totally true.

The clink of glasses has replaced the long-ago clink of prison bars at this jail-turned-luxury hotel in Beacon Hill.

This subterranean bar is welcoming in all seasons; it has a sunken patio for outdoor lounging in warm-weather months, and also a roaring indoor fireplace for snowy days.

Beneath the Hotel Commonwealth, this polished and relaxed barroom is home sweet home with plush love seats, coffee-table books for perusing, and framed photos above the fireplace.