Boston

Restaurants in Boston

Because it sits on coastline, Boston is a seafood city. New England clam chowder (with clams, potatoes, and onions), baked haddock, lobster rolls, and oyster stew are popular surf dishes. New England boiled dinner (corned beef with cabbage and root vegetables), bulkie rolls, and American chop suey are prevalent turf options. If you want traditionally-prepared Boston seafood, get a table at the Island Creek Oyster Bar on Commonwealth Ave. They have one of the best raw oyster bars in Boston and a menu filled with lobster rolls, oyster sliders, fish and chips, and seafood casserole.

Boston, also home to a big Latino population, is just as likely to serve seafood paella and mofongo as they are clams. Orinoco, with locations in South End, Brookline Village, and Harvard Square, has been voted Boston’s best Latin American restaurant for the past three years. Feast on arepas and empanadas over Sunday brunch. Try Formaggio Kitchen for the best selection of imported cheeses and cured meats in town, or the Hi-Rise Bread Company for baguettes and specialty breads. Some other notable foods to try are Boston baked beans (flavored with maple syrup and bacon) and delicious Boston crème pie.

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Lantern-lit restaurant and lounge. Drinks at this pan-Asian restaurant are presented in bamboo-shaped glass tumblers or large clay pots with straws.

Restaurateur Christopher Myers and his fiancée, chef Joanne Chang (of the beloved Flour bakery), serve distinctive interpretations of Chinese, Vietnamese and Thai dishes like mu la lat wraps (lemongrass pork meatballs, lettuce and Thai basil) and a pork stir-fry with yellow chives, crispy fried s

Located in the Garage, a small Harvard Square mall, this quick-service eatery is known for its authentic and affordable Vietnamese cuisine. The dining area is a simple, no-frills space, although it does have ample seating and funnel-shaped lanterns hanging from the ceiling.

Even Boston’s Brahmins go bonkers for this homey neighborhood joint where chef Barry Maiden marries greenmarket sensibility to down-home Appalachian flavors. Haute-cuisine– trained Maiden is an ace with cornmeal-battered oysters and Bourbon-braised pork shoulder.

Salts, located in Cambridge along the edge of the MIT campus, offers French-inspired American cuisine under the supervision of co-owners Gabriel Bremer and Analia Verolo, who proudly note on their menu that much of the produce comes from their own farm in New Hampshire.

In the spirit of brotherly competition, chefs David and Bob Kinkead established this South End success in 2004. The restaurant is based on an unusual concept: a “dueling” menu featuring each brother’s take on the same main ingredients.

Since 1904, many locals have been making the trip across the Charles River to East Boston to enjoy the authentic pies at Santarpio's. The eatery is known for its crispy-crusted Neapolitan pizza with edges slightly blackened from the brick oven.

This eclectic Harvard Square eatery contains two distinct yet equally colorful dining rooms. The first, the Monday Club Bar, is decorated in jewel tones, with a rose-colored bar, green-and-gold walls, and two fireplaces.

Since its 2007 debut, this Somerville eatery has become a hot spot among locals.

The Financial District's High Street is home to Radius, owned by award-winning chef Michael Schlow. Highlighted by white columns and decorative molding, the restaurant’s main dining room is circular shaped and filled with white-linen-covered tables.

Chef Barbara Lynch, the celebrated owner of No. 9 Park and B&G Oysters, continues to impress patrons with this contemporary twist on a traditional diner.