Boston

Restaurants in Boston

Because it sits on coastline, Boston is a seafood city. New England clam chowder (with clams, potatoes, and onions), baked haddock, lobster rolls, and oyster stew are popular surf dishes. New England boiled dinner (corned beef with cabbage and root vegetables), bulkie rolls, and American chop suey are prevalent turf options. If you want traditionally-prepared Boston seafood, get a table at the Island Creek Oyster Bar on Commonwealth Ave. They have one of the best raw oyster bars in Boston and a menu filled with lobster rolls, oyster sliders, fish and chips, and seafood casserole.

Boston, also home to a big Latino population, is just as likely to serve seafood paella and mofongo as they are clams. Orinoco, with locations in South End, Brookline Village, and Harvard Square, has been voted Boston’s best Latin American restaurant for the past three years. Feast on arepas and empanadas over Sunday brunch. Try Formaggio Kitchen for the best selection of imported cheeses and cured meats in town, or the Hi-Rise Bread Company for baguettes and specialty breads. Some other notable foods to try are Boston baked beans (flavored with maple syrup and bacon) and delicious Boston crème pie.

You may expect to find the great Mexican food just across the street from Boston's iconic Fenway Park, but this smart little taqueria has emerged as one of the neighborhood's most buzz-worthy dining spots thanks to award-winning chef Ken Oringer gourmet take on Mexican fast food.

Pushing the boundaries of fusion cuisine, chef Paul O’Connell seamlessly blends French and Cuban flavors at Chez Henri, located near Harvard Square. Behind the bright red façade, the interior has an upscale, urban vibe with dark wood floors, dim lighting, and frosted glass panels.

Inspired by the 1920’s and 30’s, this eclectic restaurant combines a whimsical bohemian style with old Hollywood glamour. The museum-like interior contains 19th-century stained glass; photographs of famed pinup girl Dita von Teese; Henri G.

In his hard-to-find restaurant with high ceilings and dark brick walls, chef-owner Tim Cushman brilliantly and improbably combines his Japanese training with his New England background in dishes like grilled lobster with shiso tempura, seared foie gras nigiri in aged sake, and fried Kumamoto oyst

Renowned chef Barbara Lynch, also the owner of Boston’s B&G Oysters and No. 9 Park, draws on her on own memories of traveling in France and Italy to create an innovative dining experience at this Shawmut eatery.

One of the most celebrated restaurants in Boston’s North End, this intimate Italian trattoria is known for its romantic candlelit dining room.

Since opening in 1983, this Back Bay icon has been consistently ranked among the best steakhouses in New England.

Season 1 runner-up Tiffani Faison was full steam ahead from the onset with a take-no-prisoners attitude and a self-taught “food as art” cooking philosophy. She became executive chef of South End’s ROCCA earlier this year after proving her aptitude for the restaurant’s signature Ligurian cuisine.

Chef Patricia Yeo cut her teeth working alongside Bobby Flay before turning her attention to Southeast Asian cuisine, and, eventually, to Om Restaurant in Harvard Square.

Adjacent to the Boston Center for the Arts in Boston’s gentrified South End, Hamersley's Bistro occupies a red brick building that once housed a piano factory.