Bordeaux Region

Bordeaux Region Travel Guide

A rotating roster of guest DJs sets the tone at the tiny zinc bar with a loyal following. The festivities often spill into the street. Late night, intrepid partiers move on to the dockland discos at the eastern fringe of the port.

The city-sponsored program offers wine-country weekend tours and onsite two-hour tasting courses at a posh-looking but bargain-priced wine bar.

Just off the D2 highway—known as the Route des Châteaux—this 128-acre winery is easily recognizable by its two conical turrets rising behind a wrought-iron railing.

The company operates throughout France and Italy, but the shining jewel is the Bordeaux Prestige Tour. The Bordeaux Prestige Tour is offered three times annually, usually in May and June. The Caveat: The cultural components of these trips are limited.

A group of 49 merchants stock everything from Renaissance art to mid-20th-century treasures. Don't expect to find a great bargain; for that, hunters will have better luck at the weekly flea market outside the neighboring Saint Michel Church.

It wouldn't be a trip to Bordeaux without, well, a bottle of Bordeaux. Oenophiles and amateur tasters alike will find something to love at the Maison du Vin de Bordeaux.

Chateau Pichon-Longueville is known locally as Pichon Baron. Located northwest of Bordeaux along the Garonne River between the towns of Pauillac and Saint-Julien Beychevelle, the domaine includes 172 acres planted with Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, and Petit Verdot grapes.

When travelers think of French nightclubs, visions of Paris's trendy, velvet rope venues—with their pulse pounding club music, hypnotic lightshows, and super model clientele—usually spring to mind.

The wine bar is run by three friends, one of whom is an expert on the local estates, from which he handpicks wines for the menu. Chartrons also hosts frequent tastings.

Château Grand Callamand is both a winery and a bed-and-breakfast. Located near the town of Pertuis in Luberon National Park, the château is owned by the Souzan-Delagrave family, who tend to both the vines and the inn.

Located northwest of Bordeaux proper, the Château Giscours winery is set on a hilltop in the commune of Labarde. The domaine started producing Margaux appellation wines in the 1500’s and today grows Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, and Petit Verdot grapes.

You'll get an eyeful of decorative objects and other furnishings by cutting-edge designers such as Christophe Pillet, Jurgen Bey, and Karim Rashid. Loup's owner, Sylvain Labrosse, also curates seasonal art exhibitions.

The former archbishop's residence houses a vast collection that includes two wings full of paintings from 17th-century masters, another wing with 19th-century French painters, as well as 20th-century luminaries, such as Matisse, Kokoschka, and Picasso.

Anyone who visits Winery can take the signe oenologique test for either $22 or $37, depending on the quality of wines being poured.

Château Beychevelle is an estate along La Gironde about 30 miles northwest of Bordeaux near the village of St.-Julien.