Berlin

Things to do in Berlin

Berlin is bustling with activities, day and night, so no matter what you’re in the mood for there are plenty of activities in Berlin to make your stay worthwhile.
There’s always something to do in Berlin! If you’re an art lover, check out Berlinische Galerie, a former glass warehouse repurposed to show contemporary art, photography, and architecture. It’s home to a permanent collection that dates back to the 1870s. At the other end of the city, is MountMitte, Europe’s largest inner-city beach/outdoor amusement park. Complete with a high rope course and a view of Fernsehturm, MountMitte is a must for traveling families. Berlin is no sleepy city and finding a great nightclub is easy. Berghain is one of Berlin’s top-rated clubs, with hypnotizing music that’ll have you dancing well into morning. Sisyphos is another hotspot with multiple dance floors, both indoor and outdoor. Looking for an evening off your feet? There are over 50 theaters in Berlin, including The Deutsches Theater (live theater performances), the Deutsche Oper Berlin (one of Berlin’s three opera houses), and the Berlin Philharmonic (one of seven orchestras in Berlin).

The Academy’s villa is located in the near-distant suburb of Wannsee, across the lake from the House of the Wannsee Conference, where the Final Solution to the so-called “Jewish Problem” was signed. The estate had been owned by a Jewish banker who fled the country during the 1930’s.

This bar’s name is a reference to the 40-second elevator ride that clubgoers must take to reach its 8th floor location. Once the elevator doors open, its occupants enter a space that is part futuristic, part vintage 1980's. The space has white walls, and low, white tables and banquettes.

Over the past few decades, Galerie Max Hetzler has established itself as one of Berlin’s most important and successful art galleries. The gallery, which relocated to the Wedding district in 2007, is known for its exhibits of U.S.

Berlin's oldest beer garden. In the hipster neighborhood of Prenzlauer Berg. The interior is as bare as can be, with wooden benches and simple chairs, but after a couple of halb-litres of Prater schwarzbier the place becomes as comfy as an old shoe.

In Kreuzberg, the Monarch bar, on the second floor of a hilariously dreary housing project, beckons the 40-year-old hipster who wishes to turn the clock back by exactly 15 years and is ready to groove to a disco version of “Hava Nagila” or the gypsy-punk band Gogol Bordello.

One of Berlin’s most important art museums, the Alte Nationalgalerie, or Old National Gallery, is one of five museums located on the city’s famed Museum Island. The building, which resembles a Greek temple, was designed by Friedrich August Stüler and was constructed between 1866 and 1876.

Tables are cleared at 11 p.m. to make room for an epic dance floor between two-story-tall lighted pillars.

A must-see for any Potsdam itinerary, visit Erich Mendelsohn's 1921 masterpiece.

More gallery and “art lab” than museum, the KW Institute for Contemporary Art was established in the 1990’s to foster creative expression and support for the arts in Berlin.

This kitchenware empire stocks an enviable collection of tinted glassware.

The vodka martinis are excellent, and the bar’s architecture alone is worth the visit—this former GDR cosmetics studio is an open constructivist glass box that would rank with the best of Warsaw Pact design.

Founded by Heinz Gindullis, the man behind popular Berlin nightclub, Cookies, Greenwich is an upscale bar for Berliners and tourists in-the-know.

Arguably one of the world’s finest archaeological museums, the Pergamon sits proudly in the center of the city’s famed Museumsinsel (Museum Island), a collection of five spectacular museums that’s also a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Notorious Berlin club entrepreneur Heinz “Cookie” Gindullis has been a household word for Berlin’s revelers since he opened the first Cookies in 1994. After years of searching for a new home, Cookies’ latest (fifth!) incarnation has revived its old spirit in what was once a cinema.