Berlin

Berlin Travel Guide

Located on Kohlfurter Strasse, the Barbara Weiss Gallery was established in 1992 and showcases the pieces of German and international artists. The gallery displays a variety of works, including sculptures, paintings, and photographs.

Located in Friedrichschain, Schoene Schreibwaren is a specialty art supply store catering to writers, artists, and doodlers alike.

A biennial festival celebrating contemporary art, the Berlin Biennale was established in 1996 under the guidance of Klaus Biesenbach, the founding director of the KW Institute for Contemporary Art.

One of only a handful of standing sections of the Berlin Wall, the East Side Gallery is by far the longest and certainly the most interesting.

The concert hall, by architect Hans Scharoun, is widely considered one of the best in the world and still the greatest artistic joy the city has to offer. The audience is seated like the U.N. General Assembly around the warm, glowing orchestra stage.

The club hosts an energetic bingo night in addition to bills of see-them-now bands.

Inspired by the risqué glamour of Berlin-born photographer Helmut Newton—his mural-size black-and-white nudes adorn the entire back wall—this swanky lounge across from the Gendarmenmarkt is a sultry spot for a rendezvous.

The club is the home of the World Championship for Chess Boxing, where the contenders play chess for four minutes and then beat each other up.

The retro-casual hat collection is made by hand in a range of materials (cotton; raffia; Panama straw).

Located near Rosa-Luxemburg Platz, Pro QM is arguably one of the most unique and influential bookstores in Berlin.

One of the five museums on Berlin’s Museum Island, the Bode Museum opened in 1904. The museum is renowned for its Museum of Byzantine Art, as well as its impressive Sculpture Collection.

Founded by Michael Oehler and Angela Spieth in 1992, Trippen is committed to producing and selling sustainable, environmentally-friendly, and functional footwear.

Berlinomat sells mostly Berlin-sourced stuff: books, clothes, a cookie cutter shaped like the Fernsehturm (Berlin’s famous TV tower).

The Academy’s villa is located in the near-distant suburb of Wannsee, across the lake from the House of the Wannsee Conference, where the Final Solution to the so-called “Jewish Problem” was signed. The estate had been owned by a Jewish banker who fled the country during the 1930’s.

This bar’s name is a reference to the 40-second elevator ride that clubgoers must take to reach its 8th floor location. Once the elevator doors open, its occupants enter a space that is part futuristic, part vintage 1980's. The space has white walls, and low, white tables and banquettes.