Berlin

Berlin Travel Guide

Berlin is bustling with activities, day and night, so no matter what you’re in the mood for there are plenty of activities in Berlin to make your stay worthwhile.
There’s always something to do in Berlin! If you’re an art lover, check out Berlinische Galerie, a former glass warehouse repurposed to show contemporary art, photography, and architecture. It’s home to a permanent collection that dates back to the 1870s. At the other end of the city, is MountMitte, Europe’s largest inner-city beach/outdoor amusement park. Complete with a high rope course and a view of Fernsehturm, MountMitte is a must for traveling families. Berlin is no sleepy city and finding a great nightclub is easy. Berghain is one of Berlin’s top-rated clubs, with hypnotizing music that’ll have you dancing well into morning. Sisyphos is another hotspot with multiple dance floors, both indoor and outdoor. Looking for an evening off your feet? There are over 50 theaters in Berlin, including The Deutsches Theater (live theater performances), the Deutsche Oper Berlin (one of Berlin’s three opera houses), and the Berlin Philharmonic (one of seven orchestras in Berlin).

Walter Gropius’s 1919 Bauhaus Manifesto championed the synergy of art and craftsmanship in design—and the sleek, beautifully made merchandise offered here reflects that marriage.  Many of the shop’s housewares and objets are iconic representations of Bauhaus design—like Marianne Brandt’s 1926 ash

A branch of the well-known German housewares and lifestyle retailer Manufactum, Brot & Butter is housed inside the seven-story Hardenburg at Ernst-Reuter-Platz, built in the 1950’s.

The Gleis 17 Memorial was constructed to commemorate the deportation of Jews via the German railway system during the Nazi regime. The site of the memorial, Grunewald Station, serviced trains carrying Jews between 1941 and 1942.

This eponymous gallery of one of the New Leipzig School’s founders shows the work of emerging artists.

This hip favorite is housed in a muscular former power station in a nether zone between West Kreuzberg and the gentrifying Friedrichshain area of the East (you’ll simply never find it).

A grocery store in the front, and a deligthfully boisterous neighborhood restaurant in the back.

Ever since Berlin’s first tented fashion week took place at Brandenburg Gate in the summer of 2007, the city’s up-and-coming fashionistas have been rapidly carving a high-style niche in the city.

Just behind Potsdamer Platz—and anchoring the jagged golden twins that are the Philharmonic and the city library—sits the starkly modern glass cube of the New National Gallery, designed in the 1960s by Mies van der Rohe.

Located on Kohlfurter Strasse, the Barbara Weiss Gallery was established in 1992 and showcases the pieces of German and international artists. The gallery displays a variety of works, including sculptures, paintings, and photographs.

Located in Friedrichschain, Schoene Schreibwaren is a specialty art supply store catering to writers, artists, and doodlers alike.

A biennial festival celebrating contemporary art, the Berlin Biennale was established in 1996 under the guidance of Klaus Biesenbach, the founding director of the KW Institute for Contemporary Art.

One of only a handful of standing sections of the Berlin Wall, the East Side Gallery is by far the longest and certainly the most interesting.

The concert hall, by architect Hans Scharoun, is widely considered one of the best in the world and still the greatest artistic joy the city has to offer. The audience is seated like the U.N. General Assembly around the warm, glowing orchestra stage.

The club hosts an energetic bingo night in addition to bills of see-them-now bands.

The club is the home of the World Championship for Chess Boxing, where the contenders play chess for four minutes and then beat each other up.