Berkshires + Western Massachusetts

Things to do in Berkshires + Western Massachusetts

This complex has it all—over 50 dealers under a single roof selling everything from antique high chairs to Oriental rugs.

This 37-member consortium of Berkshire-area dealers from Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New York is a go-to source for fine American furniture, Delft earthenware, French finials.

An ultra-green picking experience can be had at this intimate orchard in western Massachusetts that has offered PYO only since 2008. Orchardists Jen Williams and Steve Gougeon eschew even the use of broad-spectrum pesticides approved for organic orchards.

The campus museum boasts 10 galleries dedicated to Asian, Renaissance, and contemporary art.

Three times a year, the 18th-century town of Brimfield is overwhelmed by a series of antiques shows set up in humongous open fields for a six-day stretch. Virtually anything you collect, no matter how obscure, will likely turn up among the merchandise at the 5,000-odd tents.

The museum is a village in miniature spread over 13 acres, with 26 buildings dedicated to art, music, dance, film, and theater. The institution can showcase exhibits of immense proportions and is the largest center for contemporary visual and performing arts in the country.

Four centuries of American life gather under one roof in a retired buggy whip factory in Southfield, which now rounds up some 35 antique sellers. Finds range from Art Deco bookends to 19th-century trunks.

Opens late September.

At the entrance satnad Eyes (2001), massive gray marble slabs with round, watchful eyes perched on top, by phenomenal Paris-born sculptor Louise Bourgeois.

This onetime general store and gas station now sells local edibles—including croissants, pies, and a changing slate of house-made gelatos like coconut almond and wild black cherry.

The new Stone Hill Center was desined by Pritzker-winner Japanese architect Tadao Ando. The original museum is a glowing white-marble temple desined by Daniel Perry in 1955.

The museum has everything hoop-related.

The institution is known as a compact bastion of American treasures - Robert Henri's Salome (1909) is housed here. The museum has recently acquired a collection of Russian art, mostly the fits of one collector, Thomas P. Whitney, class of 1937.